Daily Archives: July 2, 2012

The ROI Of Social Media – Video Infographic

Social media has captured the attention and awe of the marketing world with the promise of increased customer engagement and lower marketing costs. Yet behind the buzz lies the question of how to measure its success. With no standard means of measurement, it is difficult to decipher the value of different platforms and determine the true ROI of social media marketing. To make sense of the situation, MDG Advertising created an eye-opening video based on the findings and figures from its recently-developed infographic. Watch as we feature the facts, factors, methods and metrics that marketers need to know to understand the real return of social media.

Source: MDG Advertising

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The ROI of Social Media – Infographic

Infographic: The ROI of Social Media

Infographic by MDG Advertising

Is social media marketing effective? That’s the question being asked as more and more businesses are investing in increasing amounts of social media marketing. With no standard means of measurement, there’s a wide variety of goals and metrics used to define the ROI of social strategies. Fortunately, this enlightening infographic, developed by MDG Advertising, helps clear up the confusion by outlining the objectives, benefits and factors that affect the success of social media marketing.

Source: MDG Advertising

Social Media Marketing vs Search Marketing – Video Infographic

Social media and search marketing are becoming more and more integrated as digital marketers realize their collective power for generating leads, building brand awareness, increasing local visibility, and maximizing interactivity. While they continue to prove their value as a potent pair, social and search each have their unique attributes and one often outshines the other in regard to specific online pursuits. To show how social media and search marketing match up to each other, as well as together, for achieving a variety of online advertising objectives, MDG Advertising developed this insightful video infographic.

Since lead generation is always a top priority for brands, digital marketers are constantly trying and testing different online strategies to achieve optimal results. Both B2B and B2C marketers agree that search marketing is more effective and efficient for generating leads than social media. So when it comes to leads, search clearly takes the lead.

Yet increasing brand awareness is an entirely different situation. While search is ideal for driving Web traffic and generating leads, social media can be a powerhouse when it comes to building brand awareness and maximizing brand exposure. In fact, these brand benefits are often cited as the main advantages of using social media in online advertising. For boosting brand awareness, social media takes the top spot.

With the issue of visibility for local businesses, the preference for search over social is surprisingly strong. Research shows that a whopping one-third of consumers depend on search engines to locate local businesses, while barely 3 percent rely on social media sites. Clearly, search marketing is the far-and-away choice when looking local.

Lastly, the goal of interactivity can be achieved by both social media and search marketing, yet more online marketers use social media as an interactive marketing tool. Social media offers limitless opportunities for communicating and connecting, which search simply cannot provide to the same extent.

Fortunately, marketers don’t have to choose only search or social to achieve their online objectives. Using these tools in tandem can often deliver the best results and a better return. With new search algorithms factoring social media into search rankings, and social networks introducing search features of their own, marketers must embrace this new mutual marketing phenomenon. Search and social no longer stand alone. By using these tools together, marketers can develop stronger online advertising strategies that can make their companies stand apart.

Source: MDG Advertising

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Scoring Klout – How Klout Works – Infographic

By Shea Bennett on June 29, 2012 6:00 AM

Are you a fan of Klout?

Perhaps, like me, you’re a skeptic. Perhaps you’ve heard of Klout, but don’t really know how it works. Perhaps you use Klout, but don’t know much about it. Perhaps you want to use Klout, need more information, but are trapped under something heavy.

Boy, have we got the infographic for you.

Everyone has influence, and Klout has made it their mission to tell each of us what that is. They accomplish this by using data from your social networks to gauge your Klout Score, which is a number between 1 and 100. The average Klout score is actually 20, so anything above this means you have more Klout than your common or garden social networker. And as your score increases, it becomes exponentially harder to increase your Klout.

Why would you want to do this? Well, that’s the $64,000 question. Cynics say that your Klout score only really matters to other Klout users, but folks who boast a high number can receive all manner of perks and freebies (although that’s mostly limited to those lucky folks in Silicon Valley the U.S.). Everybody likes perks and freebies, so many people try really hard to boost their score, which makes them more attractive to perk-providing brands, plus anyone impressed by a high Klout number, who the brands hope to target. Rinse and repeat.

Yeah, it’s all one big circle jerk. But however you feel – and I hope I haven’t influenced you in any way – knowledge is power, so this infographic might help to pull the curtain away from exactly what it is that they do to calculate your Klout score. Whether that makes the service any more valuable is something that you will have to decide. But I will say this: any system that determines that a 17-year old Canadian teenybopper has more online credibility than the political leader of the free world needs to be taken with a very hefty pinch.

And me? My Klout score says I’m more influential than Pepsi. In your face, sugar water. In your face.

Source: Shea Bennett, mediabistro.com, thedegree360.com