Daily Archives: July 31, 2012

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Marketers Lack Business Credibility – Infographic

he infographic below from InventHelp says that CEO’s think marketers lack business credibility and that we don’t talk about what really matters: Sales. Do you think that’s true? I think I would have to agree.

For whatever reason as marketers we’ve chosen to try to get executives to understand marketing instead of using that time to show them why marketing matters to them: Because it drives sales. The same is true for social media. We are redefining ROI, presenting metrics that require a Ph.D. in cool to understand, and arguing that social media ROI is immeasurable. It’s not, but it will require that marketers change their point of reference.

Instead of focusing on social media metrics, start focusing on business objectives. Businesses are in business to drive more revenue and decrease costs. Why? More revenue means we are selling more. Decreasing costs means those sales add more profit to the bottom line. You’ll never hear an executive boasting about the $50,000 “value” of FREE e-books they got downloaded on their website. However, you will hear them boasting about how they drove $25,000 in real revenue from leads that came from the company’s blog.

This is a good infographic to help you start the process of connecting to the bottom line. When it comes to social reporting through Google Analytics, be cautious about putting too much weight into the numbers assigned to social media conversions and social media assists. These numbers can not be validated through the interface. We can’t see which campaigns our assists actually converted under, nor can we see the campaign history that led to a conversion.

If you are using custom URL parameters on your social links and you compare the social media traffic that social reports catches and what you know you’ve sent, don’t be surprised if you see stark differences. I love the idea of social reports, but I’m not 100% sold on the accuracy of the data. Actually, I’m not 1% sold on the accuracy of the data. I see drastic differences between traffic I know came from social and what shows up in the social reports interface. But I’m sure improvements will come over time. In the meantime, enjoy this lovely depiction of measuring Facebook and Twitter ROI.

Source: Social Media Explorer, InventHelp

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Are You Ready To Disclose Every Single Step You Make? – Infographic

Through various social media platforms, we’re able to share all the necessary, and unnecessary, details of our existence. This infographic done with Visible Technologies begs the question; are we ready to literally disclose our every step?

Source: Columnfivemedia.com, Visible Technologies

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Facebook’s Information About Olympics Fans – Infographic

Olympics fans like sports. But what do they Like? Facebook — who else? — holds many interesting insights there.

Social media advertising company Compass Labs recently analyzed Facebook fans of the official Olympic Games and U.S. Olympic Team pages to compile some revealing profiles of how the two groups match up. And don’t worry about a small sample size — combined, the two pages have about 5.7 million fans. Compass Labs cross-referenced Likers’ other favorited Facebook pages to find which sports, movies, brands and TV shows rate highest with each group.

Overall, the two pages corral similar demographics. Both the U.S. team and the Olympics at large have fan bases that are about 55% female, and each count the 18-25 age group as their biggest bloc. After that, though, things get pretty different.

U.S. fans list track and field as their top sport, but it’s just eighth among overall Olympics aficionados. Fans of the Games in general go for, in order: ice hockey, badminton, archery, rowing, field hockey and gymnastics. None of those crack the top 10 sports for U.S. fans. Among individual athletes, however, swimmer Michael Phelps rules with both groups.

When it comes to brand loyalty, fans of The Olympic Games tend to be a bit more worldly with their biggest favorites than fans of the U.S. Olympic Team do. National Geographic, Gucci and Air Canada take three of the top four brand spots among fans of the Games.

US Olympic Team fans’ most-like brand, according to Compass Labs? Dow Chemical Company. We’re not quite sure what to make of that either.

Source: Mashable.com, Thumbnail image courtesy of iStockphoto, cmannphoto, compass labs

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The Cost Of Being Iron Man – Infographic

If you’ve been paying attention to the financial section of today’s superhero news, you will have already noted the high cost of being Batman: $682 million. That’s according to one estimate of the comic book character’s costs by by British online financial marketplace MoneySupermarket.com.

Big whoop, says Tony Stark.

The cost of being Iron Man, from the tip of his gold-titanium exoskeleton to the last drop of fuel in his Audi R8, adds up to more than $1.6 billion, according to one estimate by — you guessed it — MoneySupermarket.com.

We’re a little more confident in this estimate, however. Whereas the Batman study cited only “our research,” this one lists a range of sites with expertise in movie, comics and cars.

Or maybe it’s just that Marvel (another source) likes to exaggerate in its pages more than DC Comics does. Whichever it is, we’re hooked on the format, and can’t wait to see the infographic on the high cost of being Superman.

Source: Mashable.com, moneysupermarket.com