Daily Archives: August 13, 2012

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What Type Of Social Media Personality Are You? – Infographic

In 1921, psychologist Carl Jung changed the fundamentals of his field. By distributing a psychometric test called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to patients, Jung claimed he could accurately boil down the psychological types of humans into 16 major categories.

Still in use today, the metrics determine whether test takers tend toward certain character traits, such as introversion (I) vs. extroversion (E) or thinking (T) vs. feeling (F). Once taken, test results produce an acronym per individual. For example, “ISTJ” is for an Introvert-Sensing-Thinking-Judging person.

The infographic below, based on data by CPP, publishers of the Myers-Briggs personality assessment, details the qualifiers for each of the test’s characteristics, but furthermore, predicts the psychological types most likely to participate on specific social networks. More extroverts reported using Facebook than introverts, for instance. And people with inclinations toward Feeling spend more time browsing and interacting with people on Facebook, rather than those who tend toward Thinking.

If you’d like to learn your own Myers-Briggs indicator, visit this product page for more information.

Source: Mashable.com, Myers-Briggs

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How Social Media Users Share And Use Online Music – Infographic

Music is a big part of everyone’s life, with 45% of people listening to 10 or more hours of music each week, according to a recent study by Market Research. And social music players like Pandora and Spotify are ruling the airwaves.

Not so surprisingly though, people enjoy using music streamers, but not paying for the premium versions of those players. Only 20% will cash in to hear some tunes, and 60% of listeners are downloading only the free version of songs.

Source: Mashable.com, Lab42

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Is Google+ Really A Ghost Town? – Infographic

There’s a lot of conflicting data out there about Google+. A few studies over the past few months have portrayed the fledgling social network as relatively moribund, but another recent report from Experian Hitwise says visits to the network are growing substantially, hitting 34.9 million for the week ended Aug. 4 compared to 21.9 million visits for the week ended July 21 — a 59% jump in two weeks.

Whether the network is thriving or not, this research from Umpf, a UK-based social media firm, shows that activity on G+ is low compared to other social networks.

To prove the point, Umpf analyzed 100 online news stories across G+, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. The company then determined the average number of users per 100 million likely to share a story. As the infographic below shows, the gulf between G+ and Twitter in this regard is stark: Only six G+ users out of 100 million shared, compared to 197.3 out of 100 million for Twitter. The difference wasn’t as large for Facebook and LinkedIn, but G+ was still a distant fourth.

What do you think? Is this a fair comparison?

Source: Mashable.com, Umpf

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The Future Of Healthcare At Your Fingertips – Infographic

Parents already know the fear that sets in when you think your child has an ear infection.

Then there’s the mind-numbing screams that your child will make during the time it takes to get to the doctor, fill out the necessary forms and wait to be seen.

All in all, an unpleasant experience for both you and your child (and your eardrums).

Now what if that process was dwindled to using your smartphone to snap a photo of your child’s ear and uploading it to an app. From there, a doctor could diagnose the infection and prescribe the medicine. You’ll bypass doctors’ offices and lines altogether.

Mobile apps like this already exist and are attempting to simplify patient care. But researchers at Rock Health have found that even though there are more than 13,000 digital medical apps, patients have yet to flock to the trend.

Working with health startup Greatist, Rock Health produced this infographic to explain the power of mobile healthcare.

“It’s here and it’s happening,” Leslie Ziegler, Chief Evangelist of Rock Health, tells Mashable. “Theres still a long way to go but it really has the power to impact peoples lives in a very meaningful way.”

The mobile healthcare industry has made significant strides within the healthcare provider community. Rock Health found 75% of small and medium size medical and dental offices will purchase tablets within the next year. And almost 40% of physicians use medical apps on a daily basis.

The digital healthcare field is also alleviating the costs of patientcare and increasing the scale at which doctors and nurses can help people. The healthcare industry is already strained, Ziegler says, and a shortage of primary care physicians in years to come will only exacerbate the problem. She says mobile apps can bridge that gap.

But patients have been slower to realize the impact apps could have, Ziegler says, potentially because the apps force people to take notice of their health.

“No one wants to actively track what they are always doing, so we really want to make the experience passive,” she told us, adding, they are working to make tech and apps that “provide incentives for people to manage health more efficiently.”

Consumers are also generally unaware of how quickly the space of mobile health is growing, David Tao, Chief Research Officer at Greatist, tells Mashable. He says once consumers realize the vast industry already accessible, more consumers will begin utilizing the products.

“Mobile health isn’t a replacement for healthcare, it’s a supplement,” Tao says. “These companies aren’t replacing doctors’ keen eye or experience, but the apps are just bettering communication between doctor and patient.”

Do you use mobile healthcare apps and if so which ones? Tell us in the comments below.

Source: Mashable.com, Rock Health, Greatist