Category Archives: Health

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Natural disasters are terrible events. Sometimes, when one happens far away, we aren’t aware of the full scope of effects it causes. I created this infographic to bring attention to the lasting consequences of the 2011 Japanese Tsunami. Advertisements

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An informative infographic on how to spot the signs of stroke and actions you should take when you do see these signs in someone. Stroke is the number 1 preventable cause of disability – it comes down to a matter … Continue reading

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4,000 runners started January 2013 running. 75% of runners who skip February won’t run again this year. Don’t be that statistic.

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Medical practice and online marketing. – Adults are spending more and more time on the Internet – many of them searching for healthcare information and looking to connect with medical providers in their community. This means that the obvious choice … Continue reading

52 Million People Uninsured: Health Insurance Facts – Infographic

Insurance in general is a complicated subject with many ever-changing parts. Health insurance is one of the most popular (if not the most popular) types of insurance in America today and directly affects the life of every person in this country. In the infographic below, you will find some not so well known statistics and facts about health insurance and healthcare today.

SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS

The U.S. spent 2.47 trillion dollars on health care in 2009 and it is being projected that it will spend 4.5 trillion dollars on health care in 2019.

41% of working age Americans either have medical bill problems or are currently paying off medical debt. Medical bills are a major factor in more that 60% of the personal bankruptcies in the United States. Of those, 75% of them involved individuals that actually DID have health insurance.

Over the last decade, the number of Americans without health insurance has risen from about 28 million to about 52 million. Today, 18% of Americans are uninsured.

Women pay approximately 30% more for health insurance.

Source: Enhance Insurance

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Soccer, That Beautiful Game, Eases Hypertension | Playbook | Wired.com

Soccer is more than a beautiful game — it’s good for your heart, too. A European study found three out of four hypertensive men who played the game two hours a week saw their blood pressure fall to healthy levels in six months. Photo: toksuede/Flickr

Soccer, That Beautiful Game, Eases Hypertension | Playbook | Wired.com.

The beautiful game just got a bit prettier.

A study out of Europe has shown that playing soccer might be the best way for men with hypertension to improve their blood pressure and decrease the risk of stroke while keeping fit. The study adds to our understanding of the game’s health benefits.

We’ve long known exercise brings all kinds of medical benefits, and Peter Krustrup of the lab of Sport and Health Sciences has long studied the effect of soccer on cardiorespiratory capacity, metabolic fitness and muscle and bone strength. He and his team have compared the sport to running and weight training because it is estimated that some 400 million people play it worldwide.

Their work has provided insight into the benefits of different exercises. Jogging was effective for losing fat and improving cardiovascular health, while strength training promotes musculoskeletal adaptations like posture, balance, strength and bone mineralization. Soccer, on the other hand, provides all of those benefits.

“Soccer is very effective both in terms of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal adaptations,” said Krustrup. “Soccer is an intense, variable, all-in-one training.”

Building upon that, the latest research by Krustup and researchers in England — where almost one in three men has hypertension — and Denmark found the game helps prevent cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men with hypertension. Three out of four hypertensive men in the study saw their blood pressure fall to healthy levels after six months of soccer.

“Playing soccer scores a hat trick for men with hypertension,” Krustup said. “It reduces blood pressure, improves fitness and burns fat.”

Although everyone knows exercise can reduce blood pressure, there’s been little exploration of the best activity to prescribe. Krustup was interested in determining whether soccer, the world’s most popular sport, might be especially effective.

It should be noted that his study was financed by the Danish Soccer Federation, along with the FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Center and the Danish Heart Foundation. So it’s no surprise that it would focus on soccer. But it’s also worth noting that soccer is far more popular than, say, basketball or American football, and Krustup says he wants to investigate these “intermittent team sports” in the future.

In his study, published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Krustrup and his team gathered 33 men aged 33 to 54 with mild to moderate hypertension and divided them randomly into two groups. One participated in two one-hour sessions of soccer training each week, while the other followed the advice — get active, eat well — typically offered by a general practitioner.

The groups were tested at three months and six months to determine their blood pressure, body fat, oxygen intake and other factors. The soccer players saw their average mean blood pressure reduced by 10 mmHg, twice that of the control group. Their maximum oxygen uptake and exercise capacity rose 10 percent, and their resting heart rates was lowered by eight beats per minute. Body fat dropped by an average of two kilograms, and they were found to be less tired during exercise than those in the control group, though it isn’t surprising that the people who enjoyed intense workouts for six months were fitter.

“The magnitude of response was impressive,” Krustrup said, “with reductions of 13/8 mmHg which is somewhat more than the average effects seen after endurance training for hypertensive men, like running (7/5 mmHg) and much more than what has been reported after strength training.”

Those in the control group also saw lower blood pressure, but the improvement was not nearly so pronounced, nor did they enjoy any of the other benefits the soccer players did. The next step calls for studying how soccer affects the heart’s structure and function.

Source: WiredNews

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The Perks Of Working From Home – Infographic

If you’re part of the 86% who drive to work every day, you can devise ways to lower your gas costs, save time and improve your health — by telecommuting.

The current workforce totals more than 128 million people, and while eight out of 10 people say they would like to work from home, only half are able to cut out their average 25.1-minute commutes.

If all workers who wish to telecommute were able to at least 50% of the time, the oil saved would amount to one-third of America’s Persian Gulf imports.

The infographic below, from CarInsurance.org, details the benefits of telecommuting. What is your stance on remote workplaces? Tell us in the comments.

Source: Mashable.com, CarInsurance.org

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The Rise Of Mobile Health Management Tools, Smartphones: Smarter Healthcare – Infographic

Extreme smartphone use can certainly lead to strained eyes and stiff necks. That’s the bad news. The good news? The mobile device you just can’t live without can also help facilitate better health in new, more convenient ways than ever before.

How? The rise of mobile health apps and other tools. There are currently about 40,000 mobile health apps available for tablets and smartphones, and over 500 health projects worldwide that have a mobile emphasis.

That’s according to the online health care education portal AlliedHealthWorld.com, which pulled information from a variety of sources around the web to show just how much of a positive impact smartphones can have on our well-being.

In fact, if you use exercise apps such as Runkeeper, access health records electronically or participate in wellness gamification programs, you may already be experiencing mobile’s health benefits without even realizing it. One analysis indicates that the number of people who downloaded a mobile health app in 2012 will nearly double to 247 million from last year. What can those apps do? Diet, exercise, sleep and blood pressure are just a few of the many areas covered.

All that usage is leading to mainstream recognition, too. The United States Food and Drug Administration last year began paving the way for mobile apps that ensure health claims pass an approval process before becoming available to the consumer market.

For more on how smartphones and mobile technology are changing health care, check out the infographic.

Source: Mashable.com, Allied Health World

Sugar Consumption And Health – Infographic

The consumption of sugar will always be an issue for nutritionists and health buffs everywhere. As long as sugar remains a large part of the American diet, we will continue to hear about all the negative effects sugar can have on the body. As someone who is studying nursing, it’ll be important to understand how the overconsumption of sugar may cause many health problems in the future. Many may ask: Is this concern exaggerated? Absolutely not. Sugar is in everything and it has contributed to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States. Since 1990, sugar intake has increased by 40 lbs a year. Is it a coincidence that the obesity rate has increased by 20 percent? As a nurse, you will see many cases in which a reduction of sugar intake could have gone a long way to ensuring less visits to the hospital. It’ll be important as a nurse to educate your patients on why sugar is bad and why they should limit their consumption of sugar. This infographic will show you just how getting your daily sugar fix may be contributing to many short term and long term health issues.

Source: Online Nursing Programs

Soccer: Napoli Bans Players From Sex Two Days Before Matches To Avoid Injury

According to a recent report from Football Italia, Napoli’s club doctor claims a sex ban keeps players out of harm’s way.

“Avoiding sexual activity for two days before a game is fundamental to prevent muscular strains, contractions or inflammations,” Professor Alfonso De Nicola told Corriere del Mezzogiorno.

“It is the rule for our squad. There is also a specific work done by my staff and the fitness coaches which is aimed more at prevention than cure.

“The players must be praised for the professional approach they take in their private lives too. They must always continue certain exercises at home that are taught in the training camp.”

Napoli’s manager Walter Mazzarri led the club to a fifth place finish in Serie A and a quarterfinal place in last season’s UEFA Champions League in 2011-12. With the help of Edinson Cavani and Marek Hamsik, the Naples outfit captured the Italian Cup last year.

Mazzarri’s squad only missed fifty games due to injury, compared to other clubs – AC Milan, Internazionale and Roma – who missed over 100 games last season respectively.

Other recommendations in the doctor’s regimen include sticking to a strict eating timetable, organic meals, not drinking alcohol and documenting muscular twinges.

via Napoli bans players from sex two days before matches to avoid injury – Serie A News | FOX Sports on MSN.

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Are We Brainstorming The Wrong Way? – Infographic

In open-plan advertising offices, conference rooms, and design firms everywhere, employees are being encouraged to gather together and reach inside their noggins to pull out the most original and creative ideas for good brainstorming sessions.

Turns out, decades of psychology research have shown that traditional brainstorming may not be the best way to innovate. On the contrary, collaborating in such ways yields less quality ideas than working in solitude and later meeting to share. Find out the effectiveness of brainstorming in this infographic created with Mavenlink.

Source: Columnfive, mavenlink

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Cyberbullying: Why You Should Talk To Your Kids – Infographic

There is a lot to do before your kid’s school year gets started. Hopefully, having a talk about cyberbullying will be on your to-do list.

According to a recent study by internet security company McAfee, kids are witnessing and sometimes engaging in cyber bullying. Almost one in four of teens claimed to be a target of cyberbullying and two-thirds of all teens have witnessed cruel behavior online, notes the Teen Internet Behavior study.

But only one in 10 parents are aware that their teens could be targets of cyberbullying.

Today’s schoolyard is Facebook, with slightly more than 92% of teens saying cruel behavior takes place on the site. Kids say bullies also make attacks on Twitter (23.8%), MySpace (17.7%) and Instant Messager (15.2%).

But teens will stand up to bullies online. When witnessing others being attacked, 40% of teens have told the person to stop, 20.7% have told an adult but 6.3% joined in. When being attacked themselves, 65.8% of teens responded to the attacker (with 35% responding in person).

Some of these online confrontations are hashed-out in the real world, where 4.5% of teens have been in a physical fight with an online bully, while about 15% avoided school.

Source: Mashable.com, mcaffee

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Increase Productivity With A Nap – Infographic

Exhausted from the mid-week slump? Not the folks at Huffington Post, whose office has not one but two nap rooms. Founder Arianna Huffington advocates for all things sleep-related and for good reason — naps can decrease drowsiness, increase alertness and benefit a person’s overall health.

As this illustration from Daily Infographic shows, humans consolidate sleeping time for a long period at night, but we’re designed to feel tired in the early morning hours and mid-afternoon, when a 2 p.m. nap would feel awesome. A 2- to 5-minute nap can perk you up and a 5- to 20-minute nap can improve your motor skills and performance. Siesta, anyone?

Source: Daily Infographics, Mashable.com, patio productions

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The Future Of Healthcare At Your Fingertips – Infographic

Parents already know the fear that sets in when you think your child has an ear infection.

Then there’s the mind-numbing screams that your child will make during the time it takes to get to the doctor, fill out the necessary forms and wait to be seen.

All in all, an unpleasant experience for both you and your child (and your eardrums).

Now what if that process was dwindled to using your smartphone to snap a photo of your child’s ear and uploading it to an app. From there, a doctor could diagnose the infection and prescribe the medicine. You’ll bypass doctors’ offices and lines altogether.

Mobile apps like this already exist and are attempting to simplify patient care. But researchers at Rock Health have found that even though there are more than 13,000 digital medical apps, patients have yet to flock to the trend.

Working with health startup Greatist, Rock Health produced this infographic to explain the power of mobile healthcare.

“It’s here and it’s happening,” Leslie Ziegler, Chief Evangelist of Rock Health, tells Mashable. “Theres still a long way to go but it really has the power to impact peoples lives in a very meaningful way.”

The mobile healthcare industry has made significant strides within the healthcare provider community. Rock Health found 75% of small and medium size medical and dental offices will purchase tablets within the next year. And almost 40% of physicians use medical apps on a daily basis.

The digital healthcare field is also alleviating the costs of patientcare and increasing the scale at which doctors and nurses can help people. The healthcare industry is already strained, Ziegler says, and a shortage of primary care physicians in years to come will only exacerbate the problem. She says mobile apps can bridge that gap.

But patients have been slower to realize the impact apps could have, Ziegler says, potentially because the apps force people to take notice of their health.

“No one wants to actively track what they are always doing, so we really want to make the experience passive,” she told us, adding, they are working to make tech and apps that “provide incentives for people to manage health more efficiently.”

Consumers are also generally unaware of how quickly the space of mobile health is growing, David Tao, Chief Research Officer at Greatist, tells Mashable. He says once consumers realize the vast industry already accessible, more consumers will begin utilizing the products.

“Mobile health isn’t a replacement for healthcare, it’s a supplement,” Tao says. “These companies aren’t replacing doctors’ keen eye or experience, but the apps are just bettering communication between doctor and patient.”

Do you use mobile healthcare apps and if so which ones? Tell us in the comments below.

Source: Mashable.com, Rock Health, Greatist

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What You Need To Know About Sunscreen – Infographic

Most people know they should use sunscreen to protect themselves from the sun’s harmful rays. Unfortunately, few are fully aware of how to properly use sunscreen. This is particularly true of athletes who train and compete in the sun throughout the summer.

If you’re spending long hours in the heat this summer, sunscreen could become your most important piece of training equipment. Check out the graphic below to learn how to select the right SPF, understand application and find out how different conditions impact the need to use and reapply sunscreen. Don’t find yourself sunburned on the sideline this summer because you failed to educate yourself on how to properly use sunscreen.

Source: Stack