Tag Archives: Addiction

Stuck To The Web: Addict Profile – Infographic

Please have a seat. You’re already sitting? Well… good then. Before we proceed, we want to make it clear that you’re in a safe environment and that we all care about you very much. We’ve gathered here to talk about Internet usage. Who’s using it, what are they using it for, and is it being over-used? Here is your Internet Intervention. Continue reading

We Can Only Go 90 Minutes Without The Internet. Addicted? – Infographic

An infographic breaking down internet use into time spent gaming, e-mailing, social media and even.. well, NSFW material. Also looks at addiction, age and gender influence.

Source: Siteopia, Visual.ly

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The Impact Of Email On Our Professional And Personal Lifes – Infographic

Like many of the digital tools that keep us connected (Facebook, anyone?) our relationship with email is pretty complicated. On the one hand, we’re able to stay in contact with loved ones, collaborate with others and get work done quickly. But, on the other, its very utility can easily become overwhelming and addicting.

The first email was sent in 1971, and our reliance on it only seems to be growing. The Radicati Group, a tech research firm, projects that by 2013 people around the world will send and receive a total of more than 507 billion messages every single day — more than double the number in 2009. A 2010 Harris interactive poll, however, found that the most emails an average person could reasonably manage in a given day was 50.

Too much email may not just lead to imagined stress, however. An U.S. Army experiment once found that employees who were forced to work without email for five days reported better focus and improved perceptions about their job performance. But that group also reported feeling more isolated.

This all comes via the Internet education portal master-degree-online.com, which scoured sources including The Atlantic and the Population Reference Bureau to compile a slew of statistics about our relationship with email — all of which are presented in the following infographic. Check it out below for the full report. Then, in the comments, share your best tricks for making email overload more manageable.

Source: Mashable.com

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The Social Sickness: Social Media Addiction – Infographic

Social media addiction: a disease likely affecting millions, but one that’s hard to track because it comes in many forms. The afflicted may reveal themselves as serial likers. They may have push notifications set for the most minor of social media updates. They may self-identify as “mavens,” “gurus” or “ninjas.”

But regardless of their appearance, they do walk among us. Of that we can be sure.

The following infographic, which comes by way of the marketing software company Marketo, details 10 of the most common types of social media fiends.

There’s “The Constant Checker,” who can’t go more than a few minutes without looking at his Twitter mentions or Instagram likes. There’s the Klout-obsessed “Self-Proclaimed Influencer.” There’s also the “Multi-Mayor,” who has to check in to a location every time she moves ten feet.

Any of these stereotypes hit a little too close to home? We certainly have to admit some do here. Check out the full infographic  for more. Then let us know in the comments — which of these personalities do you identify with? Are there any you would add?

Source: Mashable.com, Marketo

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Are You Addicted To Your Smartphone? – Infographic

Smartphones are awesome. They keep us connected to friends, help with directions and give us access to the Internet’s infinite wonders. But how awesome is too awesome? And when does appreciation become addiction?

Consider this: 15% of respondents to a recent Gazelle.com survey said they’d go rather go without sex for a weekend than give up their iPhone for a few days. Four percent said they’ve actually used their iPhone during sex, and 65% said they couldn’t live without their trusty device. Forty percent of respondents said they’d rather go without bathing than without their iPhone.

The Internet education portal OnlineColleges recently gathered data from a number of sources including Gazelle, comScore and the Pew Internet & American Life Project to produce the following infographic. It shows not only that we may be getting a little too attached to our smartphones, but also why we love our devices and what we use them for most.

Among many interesting findings: iPhone and Android owners have more positive outlooks on life than their Blackberry-carrying brethren; city dwellers are the most mobile savvy; and social media, gaming and weather apps rule the market. But whether addicted or simply enthusiastic, it’s easy to see why smartphone owners are so appreciative of modern mobile technology; the first consumer offering from Motorola cost almost $4,000, and was about the size of a brick.

Source: Mashable.com, onlinecolleges

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College Students Are In A Relationship With Their Smartphones – Infographic

College students aren’t just concerned with getting good grades and finding the best parties. More than ever, they’re using their smartphones to navigate life on campus.

On the bus, waiting in line, in bed, on the treadmill and even while driving, college students can’t seem to put their phones down. Fifty-two percent say they often check their phones before getting out of bed in the morning, according to one study. Nearly half do so while in bed at night before they fall asleep.

Thirty-five percent say they sometimes use their phones while driving but stopped at a red light, and nearly 20% say they sometimes use them while the wheels are even moving. But it’s not all addiction and danger. Forty-five percent of college students say smartphones frequently help with school assignments, and 46% say they’re often helpful for work-related tasks.

The Internet education portal OnlineColleges pulled this data and more from sources including the Pew Internet & American Life Project, University of Colorado and Nielsen to produce this infographic.

Among other notable findings: More colleges students use iPhones than any other device, email has nearly caught text messaging as the most popular use for smartphones among college students and nearly half of students use their phones to check the weather.

Source: Mashable.com, Online Colleges

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Social Media Teens Seek Time Offline – Infographic

Today’s American teenagers are digital natives — connected to the Internet since youth. About 75% of 13 to 17-year-olds have personal social networking accounts. Since 2008, there has been a huge spike in teenage connectivity; only 59% of teens were on social media four years ago.

Despite seeing “racist, sexist and homophonic content” online, teenagers view social media networks positively. A national survey of 1,030 13-to-17-year-old individuals, conducted by Common Sense Media, reveals teenage perceptions of their digital lives.

More than 90% of teenagers are connected to the Internet. About 68% of teens regularly text, 51% visit Facebook and about 11% send or receive tweets every day. Many teens, 41%, admit they’re “addicted” to their devices.

Teens are aware of the dangers of excessive usage and the online potential of cruelty. However, most young adults say social media and technology positively affects their social and mental well-being. Social media helps teens communicate easily with friends. Surveyed teens also believe social networks help them to be more outgoing, confident and less depressed.

Surprisingly, a majority of survey participants say they prefer to chat face-to-face instead of text or tweet. One-third of teens actually desire time off from the Internet. Around 36% of teens who responded said they wish “they could go back to a time when there was no Facebook.”

Teens who feel the highest need to unplug aren’t connected to social networks or have had bad experiences online. A third of teens have encountered racist, sexist and homophobic content “often” online, according to Common Sense Media.

Source: Mashable.com, Common Sense Media Image courtesy of iStockphoto, monkeybusinessimages