Tag Archives: Cons

Kickstarter: Pros And Cons – Infographic

This infographic created by a Media Studies Graduate student lays out the pros and cons of using the Kickstarter funding model, particularly for film makers. Continue reading

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Nokia And Apple’s Map Flop – Infographic

Nokia took advantage of the torrent of negative feedback over Apple‘s new Maps app, plugging its own mobile-mapping software in its Lumia phones.

In a blog post, Nokia talks about the challenge of creating a full-featured mapping and navigation application for mobile devices. One passage in particular seems aimed at Apple Maps, which have been praised for its beautiful 3D renderings but assailed for its inaccuracy and lack of features:

“…we also understand that ‘pretty’ isn’t enough. You expect excellence in your smartphone mapping experience.”

Citing its many years building and enhancing Nokia Maps (formerly Ovi Maps), Nokia claims its maps experience on mobile is superior due to its approach of owning, building and distributing the content and apps. Ironically, that sort of end-to-end approach is often what Apple holds over other companies, but in this case it’s Apple who acquired its technology (from acquired companies C3, Poly9 and Placebase) and data (from OpenStreetMap and others) for the Maps app in iOS 6.

With Windows Phone 8, Nokia Maps will be the default maps app for Microsoft’s mobile platform. The upcoming Lumia 920 will add augmented-reality functionality into the app, called City Lens, showing users data about businesses in view of the phone’s camera when you hold up the phone.

Apple, however, has defended its new Maps app as a work in progress. And despite its flaws, the app does include turn-by-turn navigation — something that hasn’t existed (at least not for free) on the iPhone until now. Users are also praising the app’s gorgeous 3D renderings, which Apple calls Flyover, though those are only available in some cities for now.

Nonetheless, Nokia’s point that the only comparison that matters is what “you can actually do with your smartphone” resonates. Comparing its maps with those of Apple and Google, it cites public-transit data, the ability to use maps offline (also part of its upcoming package with Windows Phone 8), and availability of turn-by-turn navigation in more countries as its main advantages over the other two platforms.

What do you think of Nokia’s criticism of Apple Maps?

Source: Mashable.com, Nokia

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E-Reading On The Rise, Books Keep Losing Ground – Infographic

The tactile pleasure of worn pages between your fingers is hard to replace. But when it comes to encouraging people to embrace the written word, e-readers trump their physical counterparts.

According to the infographic below, people who own e-book devices say they read more than people who don’t, at a rate of 24 books per year to 15. Education, escape, relaxation and entertainment rank as people’s main motivations to plow through books — proving that, whether electronically or via dead tree, reading remains a popular pastime.

E-readers are also rising in popularity, signaling that it may not be impossible to imagine a world without traditional books sometime in the not-so-distant future.

Before you scoff, consider this: From December 2011 to January 2012, e-reader ownership nearly doubled, from 10 percent to 19 percent, among American adults. And that stunning surge in just one month’s time doesn’t even account for tablets or other mobile electronic devices people use to read books and longform content. Worldwide, meanwhile, e-reader sales rose by nearly 3 million between 2010 and 2011.

It’s also interesting to look at the relationship between actual e-book consumption and ownership of a device that enables users to read books electronically. According to one study, 29% of American adults own a personal e-book device, tablets included. But just 21% of adults had actually read an e-book in the past year as of February 2012.

All this information and more comes to us from the online education portal Schools.com, which surveyed a handful of sources from around the web to produce the following infographic. Check it out below, then let us know in the comments — do you think traditional books will ever die out?

Source: Mashable.com, Schools.com