Tag Archives: Credibility

Essentials Of Press Releases: Dos And Don’ts – Infographic

Drafting a well-written and attention-grabbing press release doesn’t require a Public Relations degree. However, finding concrete news worth touting and learning the ins and outs of press release etiquette is essential for showing off your credibility and attracting the attention of busy journalists. Continue reading

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Marketers Lack Business Credibility – Infographic

he infographic below from InventHelp says that CEO’s think marketers lack business credibility and that we don’t talk about what really matters: Sales. Do you think that’s true? I think I would have to agree.

For whatever reason as marketers we’ve chosen to try to get executives to understand marketing instead of using that time to show them why marketing matters to them: Because it drives sales. The same is true for social media. We are redefining ROI, presenting metrics that require a Ph.D. in cool to understand, and arguing that social media ROI is immeasurable. It’s not, but it will require that marketers change their point of reference.

Instead of focusing on social media metrics, start focusing on business objectives. Businesses are in business to drive more revenue and decrease costs. Why? More revenue means we are selling more. Decreasing costs means those sales add more profit to the bottom line. You’ll never hear an executive boasting about the $50,000 “value” of FREE e-books they got downloaded on their website. However, you will hear them boasting about how they drove $25,000 in real revenue from leads that came from the company’s blog.

This is a good infographic to help you start the process of connecting to the bottom line. When it comes to social reporting through Google Analytics, be cautious about putting too much weight into the numbers assigned to social media conversions and social media assists. These numbers can not be validated through the interface. We can’t see which campaigns our assists actually converted under, nor can we see the campaign history that led to a conversion.

If you are using custom URL parameters on your social links and you compare the social media traffic that social reports catches and what you know you’ve sent, don’t be surprised if you see stark differences. I love the idea of social reports, but I’m not 100% sold on the accuracy of the data. Actually, I’m not 1% sold on the accuracy of the data. I see drastic differences between traffic I know came from social and what shows up in the social reports interface. But I’m sure improvements will come over time. In the meantime, enjoy this lovely depiction of measuring Facebook and Twitter ROI.

Source: Social Media Explorer, InventHelp

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Scoring Klout – How Klout Works – Infographic

By Shea Bennett on June 29, 2012 6:00 AM

Are you a fan of Klout?

Perhaps, like me, you’re a skeptic. Perhaps you’ve heard of Klout, but don’t really know how it works. Perhaps you use Klout, but don’t know much about it. Perhaps you want to use Klout, need more information, but are trapped under something heavy.

Boy, have we got the infographic for you.

Everyone has influence, and Klout has made it their mission to tell each of us what that is. They accomplish this by using data from your social networks to gauge your Klout Score, which is a number between 1 and 100. The average Klout score is actually 20, so anything above this means you have more Klout than your common or garden social networker. And as your score increases, it becomes exponentially harder to increase your Klout.

Why would you want to do this? Well, that’s the $64,000 question. Cynics say that your Klout score only really matters to other Klout users, but folks who boast a high number can receive all manner of perks and freebies (although that’s mostly limited to those lucky folks in Silicon Valley the U.S.). Everybody likes perks and freebies, so many people try really hard to boost their score, which makes them more attractive to perk-providing brands, plus anyone impressed by a high Klout number, who the brands hope to target. Rinse and repeat.

Yeah, it’s all one big circle jerk. But however you feel – and I hope I haven’t influenced you in any way – knowledge is power, so this infographic might help to pull the curtain away from exactly what it is that they do to calculate your Klout score. Whether that makes the service any more valuable is something that you will have to decide. But I will say this: any system that determines that a 17-year old Canadian teenybopper has more online credibility than the political leader of the free world needs to be taken with a very hefty pinch.

And me? My Klout score says I’m more influential than Pepsi. In your face, sugar water. In your face.

Source: Shea Bennett, mediabistro.com, thedegree360.com