Tag Archives: Difference

The Differences Between Men’s And Women’s Work Styles – Infographic

According to Wrike’s recent survey with almost 2,000 respondents, 88% of men and 85% of women regularly overwork. But who feels more stressed about this matter? What are the other remarkable differences between men’s and women’s work styles? Continue reading

Are You Caught Up in Apple’s Reality Distortion Field? – Infographic

Are You Caught Up in Apple’s Reality Distortion Field? [INFOGRAPHIC].

Do Apple lovers really “think different?” What makes those who don’t buy Apple products turn away from them? This infographic gets to the bottom of why people buy Apple products, and what keeps them from buying them. And it shows how they feel about those products once they’ve bought them.

You’ll probably agree, there’s something about buying an Apple product that makes people act differently. It could be part of that famous “reality distortion field” associated with Steve Jobs, or maybe it’s just because Apple products are actually superb. The survey behind this artwork aims to quantify that thinking, measuring the differences of opinion between Apple lovers and Apple haters.

Some of you might say there’s no reality being distorted at all, and Apple products are just far superior to its competition. At the same time, many of the 48% of U.S. adults who’ve never owned an Apple device probably don’t think Apple products are insanely great, but point to Apple aficionados as simply insane. Others in that group just plain can’t afford Apple’s expensive baubles.

What’s the truth? It wasn’t the mission of market research firm Ask Your Target Market (AYTM) to find out whether subjective opinions and feelings about Apple products were true or not. The goal was to measure the difference in thinking between those who embrace Apple products and those who don’t.

SEE ALSO: Is Apple Mapping an Alternative Universe? [SUNDAY COMICS]

Using its Ask Your Target Market research platform, AYTM Research tapped into its huge hoard of 4.5 million consumers to come up with the data behind this lovely infographic. Take a look at the full data set here.

If you’re having trouble understanding this unusual infographic, here’s a quick guide: On the left side are those who haven’t bought Apple products, and on the right are those who have been enveloped in Apple’s alleged reality distortion field.

What do you think? Are you trapped in Apple’s reality distortion field? Is there even such a thing?

Source: Mashable.com

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Nokia And Apple’s Map Flop – Infographic

Nokia took advantage of the torrent of negative feedback over Apple‘s new Maps app, plugging its own mobile-mapping software in its Lumia phones.

In a blog post, Nokia talks about the challenge of creating a full-featured mapping and navigation application for mobile devices. One passage in particular seems aimed at Apple Maps, which have been praised for its beautiful 3D renderings but assailed for its inaccuracy and lack of features:

“…we also understand that ‘pretty’ isn’t enough. You expect excellence in your smartphone mapping experience.”

Citing its many years building and enhancing Nokia Maps (formerly Ovi Maps), Nokia claims its maps experience on mobile is superior due to its approach of owning, building and distributing the content and apps. Ironically, that sort of end-to-end approach is often what Apple holds over other companies, but in this case it’s Apple who acquired its technology (from acquired companies C3, Poly9 and Placebase) and data (from OpenStreetMap and others) for the Maps app in iOS 6.

With Windows Phone 8, Nokia Maps will be the default maps app for Microsoft’s mobile platform. The upcoming Lumia 920 will add augmented-reality functionality into the app, called City Lens, showing users data about businesses in view of the phone’s camera when you hold up the phone.

Apple, however, has defended its new Maps app as a work in progress. And despite its flaws, the app does include turn-by-turn navigation — something that hasn’t existed (at least not for free) on the iPhone until now. Users are also praising the app’s gorgeous 3D renderings, which Apple calls Flyover, though those are only available in some cities for now.

Nonetheless, Nokia’s point that the only comparison that matters is what “you can actually do with your smartphone” resonates. Comparing its maps with those of Apple and Google, it cites public-transit data, the ability to use maps offline (also part of its upcoming package with Windows Phone 8), and availability of turn-by-turn navigation in more countries as its main advantages over the other two platforms.

What do you think of Nokia’s criticism of Apple Maps?

Source: Mashable.com, Nokia

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Social Media Marketing VS. Traditional Marketing – Infographic

Social media has rapidly integrated itself into our everyday lives, both personal and professional, and it’s perhaps had no greater impact than on the world of marketing, with consumers and brands seeing enormous benefits and changes.

But how does social media compare to traditional marketing? What are the pros and cons of each?

The advantages of social media marketing are numerous.

It’s cheaper. A lot cheaper. You can reach 1,000 people for a fraction of the cost using social media than you can through television, billboards or even email
Social media is the only marketing platform that allows you to engage and interact with your consumers – it’s a two-way relationship, which can be hugely lucrative for brands
The results are measurable, and marketers can take immediate action to spot trends and re-align campaigns

It’s not all gravy, though. Social media campaigns can be time consuming and the impact can disseminate very quickly, whereas traditional marketing campaigns, certainly in television, can produce short term results that have greater tangibility.

This infographic from Kuhcoon.com takes a closer look at social media vs traditional marketing.

Source: mediabistro.com, kuhcoon.com

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Demographics Show Why Users Of Yahoo Mail Use More Power Than Gmail Users – Infographic

Yahoo Mail-subscribing-households use 11% more electricity per year than Gmail households, a recent study by Opower found. That adds up to nearly a whole extra month of electricity, about an extra $110 per year.

“It’s as if, relative to the average Yahoo household, the average Gmailer is strictly hang-drying their laundry, forgoing high-definition TV, and hand-washing their dishes with cold water for a year,” Opower writes in its’ blog.

So what makes for this drastic disparity in energy usage? Opower — a research company that unpacks and analyzes energy data to present to everyday consumers in an actionable way — found that the problem is one of “correlation not causation.” Meaning that the email domains aren’t driving the issue of energy usage. Instead, discrepancies are related to the core demographics of each site’s users.

“Yahoo subscribers tend to live in suburbs, be in longterm relationships, have a family,” says Barry Fischer, a head writer and a research for Opower. “Those types of lifestyle characteristics carry with them greater energy needs compared to Gmail household. [Gmailers] are found more in urban areas, are younger and are single.”

Ultimately, Opower found that even though Yahoo users live in larger residences than Gmail users, Yahoo subscribers need more electricity per square foot than Gmail users.

Opower matched up 2011 electricity rates with more than 1.5 million email addresses over 23 states to draw their conclusions — focusing on Gmail and Yahoo specifically because they were the top two email service providers of those surveyed, Fischer told Mashable.

Though Opower only analyzed 2011 data, Fischer says he believes similar patterns of higher Yahoo energy usage would have been found in previous years.

But Yahoo users can’t simply cut down on electricity charges now by signing up for a Gmail account. It’s all about lifestyle adjustments to cut back on overall energy costs, Opower says.

See more about the differences in Yahoo and Gmail users’ energy spending in the infographic.

Source: Mashable.com, Opower