Tag Archives: Fans

Content Marketing: Increase The Quality Of Your Content – Part 2, Conduct A Survey

Logo TheMainStreetAnalyst 8713679455_e0394e3f7e_zConduct a Survey

Make the most of your online community and conduct a survey. Use Survey Monkey or other online survey platforms and gather important data for free. Survey questions can include: Continue reading

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Facebook Fans: What’s the Value to a Business?

On today’s “Off The Charts,” Bloomberg’s chief markets correspondent Scarlet Fu examines the monetary impact of a Facebook Fan to businesses. She reports on Bloomberg Television’s “Market Makers.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Sports Fans And Digital Media – Infographic

With the fecundity of digital media such as social networks, online content sites and web video, 2012 is a terrific time to be a sports fan. Content abounds, highlights proliferate and there’s never a shortage of takes, opinion or commentary — sensible or otherwise.

No matter our sport of preference, Twitter, smartphones and other products of the digital age play a larger role than ever when it comes to consuming and following the games we love. We all know our own personal digital routines, but how do sports fans as a whole interact with digital and social media? How many are hardcore, and how many just follow along casually? Where do they go for news and updates?

Burst Media recently took a survey to find out and the results are displayed in the infographic below. The findings are based on a pretty small sample size of about 530 fans, so should be taken with a healthy dose of salt. Nonetheless, this is some interesting food for thought.

According to Burst’s survey results, fans between the ages of 18 and 35 use social media to follow teams and players more than to actually comment on news or share links and other content. Both men and women said they go online for sports content a few times per week, although more than one in 10 men do so several times per day. More than half of serious fans, meanwhile, use tablets or smartphones to supplement their experience while watching sports on TV.

For more findings, check out the full infographic below. Then, in the comments, let us know how it compares to your own digital sports consumption experiences and observations.

Source: Mashable.com

5 Ways to Improve Your Facebook Engagement

5 Ways to Improve Your Facebook Engagement | Social Media Examiner.

Having trouble engaging your Facebook audience?

If your fans are not interacting with your brand and sharing your content, what value are they?

In this article, you’ll discover how to get more likes, comments and shares. I’ll reveal five strategies for Facebook posts that get your fans buzzing.

#1: Keep Your Updates Short

Research repeatedly shows that the longer a post is, the less engagement it will receive.

Blame it on Twitter, but people don’t have the time or patience to read anything over 140 characters anymore.

Results vary, but research shows that 100 characters or fewer seems to be the sweet spot. This will also allow for easy cross-posting on Twitter.

Want even more engagement? Let a photo do the talking.

starbucks

Posts with fewer than 140 characters combined with bold, beautiful photos get the most response.

According to Facebook, posts that include a photo album, picture or video generate about 180%, 120% and 100% more engagement, respectively.

Starbucks is a great example of a brand combining short posts with beautiful photos. Their posts generally fall within the 100- to 140-character mark and elicit thousands of likes and comments.

#2: Don’t Use URL Shorteners

A recent study by Buddy Media found that engagement rates were three times higher for Facebook posts that use a full-length URL, rather than a link generated by a URL shortener like bit.ly.

bad bitly post

Converse fans may have liked this post, but how many actually clicked on the link? Generic bit.ly URLs are less likely to drive traffic to your site.

Why is this?

The likely explanation is that Facebook users want to know where you’re taking them. This makes even more sense considering the fact that Facebook users are increasingly accessing the social network exclusively from their mobile devices (20%, or 102 million and growing).

A shortened URL does not indicate what type of website you’re taking them to, which is a deterrent to mobile users.

But didn’t we just learn that longer posts have lower engagement? Yes, but a URL doesn’t seem to count in this instance.

If you’re worried about post length, use a brand-specific URL shortener that lets users know you’re taking them to your website.

For example, Victoria’s Secret uses http://i.victoria.com/wSl instead of this crazy-long link: http://www.victoriassecret.com/shoes/whats-new/studded-suede-pump-betsey-johnson?ProductID=68804&CatalogueType=OLS&cm_mmc=fb-_-stores-_-status-_-suedpump090512.

victoria

Get more clicks by using a brand-specific URL shortener. Fans want to know where you’re taking them.

#3: Post at Times Ideal for Your Fans

Getting your post at the top of fans’ newsfeeds is paramount for engagement. So how do you do this?

For one, make sure you post at the right times.

Recent data from bit.ly shows that the optimal time to post on Facebook is between 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm, when Facebook traffic peaks.

Links posted between 1 and 4 pm get the highest click-through rates, with Wednesday at 3:00 pm being the best time to post all week. Links posted before 8:00 am and after 8:00 pm are less likely to get shared.

Another thing to consider is the TGIF (Thank God It’s Friday) factor. As office burnout peaks toward the end of the week, more people will be escaping to Facebook.

Engagement rates are 18% higher on Thursday and Friday than other days of the week, according to Buddy Media. Engagement rates fall 3.5% below average for posts Monday through Wednesday, when people are more focused at work.

If your goal is likes, not comments, Dan Zarrella of HubSpot found that Saturday and Sunday posts get the most likes.

disney

Don’t forget about the weekend. Saturday and Sunday posts get the most likes.

Finally, make sure you post enough content to stay visible in the newsfeed without annoying your fans. The key to walking this fine line is to know your posts’ lifespan.

The average Facebook post lifespan is 3 hours, although this varies by page.

A post is considered “alive” when it’s occupying the newsfeed or is a Highlighted Story and receiving a continuous stream of engagement.

A post is considered “dead” when its engagement stops growing more than 10% per hour.

Never post while another post is alive or you risk losing engagement.

How do you find your average post lifespan? EdgeRank Checker Pro analyzes your post engagement on an hourly basis (found in the Post Grading section at the bottom of your page analysis).

edgerank

EdgeRank Checker Pro lets you know your average post lifespan and the best time to post again.

It also tells you the best time to post again. Once engagement has fallen below 10%, your post is considered dead and it’s safe to post new content.

If your average post lifespan is 3 hours, then wait at least that long before posting again.

#4: Use the Right Words for Higher Engagement

What you say—or don’t say—on Facebook matters. Certain words elicit more engagement, while others will leave your post dead in the water.

Buddy Media found that action keywords like “post,” “comment,” “take,” “submit,” “like” or “tell us” are the most effective. Be direct in your request, and fans will listen.

macy's

Want your fans to do something? Tell them! Fans respond well to specific instructions.

On the other hand, if you’re running a contest, sweepstakes or other promotional offer, fans don’t respond well to direct or aggressive language.

Softer-sell keywords such as “winner,” “win,” “winning” and “events” will make fans excited rather than feeling like they’re being sold to.

Aggressive promotional keywords like “contest,” “promotion,” “sweepstakes” and “coupon” will turn them off.

#5: Ask Questions

Asking a question is a surefire way to elicit comments, but not all questions are created equal. How and where you ask a question matters.

questions

Place questions at the end of posts to increase engagement.

Questions placed at the end of a post increased engagement by 15% over questions placed at the beginning.

Where,” “when” and “should” drive the highest engagement rates, with “would” generating the most likes. Avoid asking “why” questions, which have the lowest like and comment rates.

Beauty retailer Sephora has mastered the art of when to use action keywords, promotional keywords and questions to get fans engaged.

This Facebook post generated 38,028 likes, 2,188 comments and 4,778 shares.

sephora

Combining action keywords like “shop” with soft-sell keywords like “score” will encourage fans to take action. End your post with a question to get 15% more engagement.

For even more tips, read 5 Ways to Increase Your Facebook Engagement.

Now it’s your turn.

What do you think? Did you find these tips helpful? How do you keep your fans engaged? Please share your questions and comments in the box below.
Source: Social Media Examiner

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Facebook’s Information About Olympics Fans – Infographic

Olympics fans like sports. But what do they Like? Facebook — who else? — holds many interesting insights there.

Social media advertising company Compass Labs recently analyzed Facebook fans of the official Olympic Games and U.S. Olympic Team pages to compile some revealing profiles of how the two groups match up. And don’t worry about a small sample size — combined, the two pages have about 5.7 million fans. Compass Labs cross-referenced Likers’ other favorited Facebook pages to find which sports, movies, brands and TV shows rate highest with each group.

Overall, the two pages corral similar demographics. Both the U.S. team and the Olympics at large have fan bases that are about 55% female, and each count the 18-25 age group as their biggest bloc. After that, though, things get pretty different.

U.S. fans list track and field as their top sport, but it’s just eighth among overall Olympics aficionados. Fans of the Games in general go for, in order: ice hockey, badminton, archery, rowing, field hockey and gymnastics. None of those crack the top 10 sports for U.S. fans. Among individual athletes, however, swimmer Michael Phelps rules with both groups.

When it comes to brand loyalty, fans of The Olympic Games tend to be a bit more worldly with their biggest favorites than fans of the U.S. Olympic Team do. National Geographic, Gucci and Air Canada take three of the top four brand spots among fans of the Games.

US Olympic Team fans’ most-like brand, according to Compass Labs? Dow Chemical Company. We’re not quite sure what to make of that either.

Source: Mashable.com, Thumbnail image courtesy of iStockphoto, cmannphoto, compass labs

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The Lifeblood Of Your Business – Building A Fan Base – Infographic

People are the lifeblood of your business. Building relationships with people fosters loyalty. As a result, loyalty has the potential to increase profits. An excellent way to start building relationships with people who share similar interests is by developing a fan base. In this infographic we’ll tell you how a fan base can make a real difference and what you can do to nurture it.

Source: Visual.ly, kissmetrics

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How Sports Teams Use Social Media To Drive Ticket Sales – Infographic

Social media hasn’t only revolutionized sports fans’ experiences at the game — it’s also changed how they get there in the first place.

One in five fans use social networks to invite friends to games, according to a recent report by the Sports Business Journal. Nearly 15% of ticket buyers say their purchases have been influenced by Facebook posts.

And engaging fans on social media doesn’t just help sports teams reach potential buyers — it literally pays off. According to the same research, fans who buy tickets through social media links pay more than one-and-a-half times as much on average compared to all buyers. Why? They typically make their purchases farther in advance.

The flash deals site for sports tickets Crowd Seats recently pulled research from Ticketmaster, the Sports Business Journal and the marketing firm Burson-Marsteller to produce the infographic below…Read More

Source: Mashable.com, Crowd Seats, Sports Business Journal