Tag Archives: health

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Frequent Sex Equals Higher Income: Study

On today’s “Off The Charts,” Bloomberg chief markets correspondent Scarlet Fu looks at a recent study that found that the more sex you have the higher your income. She speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Market Makers.” (Source: Bloomberg)

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8 Reasons To Smile Today

8-reasons-to-smile_51e91d869b5e1A smile is good for you! Here you will find eight reasons, why you should definitely smile more often!  –SmileSaintLouis

Baby Boomers: Getting Older Used To Be More Comfortable – Infographic

baby-boomers-are-getting-older--who-cares_51e7881fd07b6Getting older is inevitable. Few people are comfortable thinking about aging and losing independence. Senior Care communities that strive to support staying healthy and independent are faced with growing numbers of elderly people, incomes down, health conditions up, and a wealth of new technologies hitting the market. How are communities supposed to navigate what is needed to meet the expectations of the current aging population?

This infographic shows some interesting facts and numbers about demographics that have a major influence on our society, the health care system and how we want to represent ourselves as a country. Have a good look at this infographic. If you want to get political with it, go ahead.

Source: Independa

Wanna Be A Modern Man? Here Is What It Cost You – Infographic

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Today’s modern man has high aspirations in every aspect of life; from his looks to his career. Laddish culture is no longer considered fashionable by many, and men are expected to have a far more responsible attitude to money and their health. The modern man is also often encouraged to look good, dress well and workout. Not a bad thing you may think, but how much does all this cost?

From bodybuilding supplements to moisturizer, MoneySupermarket has broken down the cost of being the ultimate modern man. Continue reading

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It’s time to change the way we approach healthcare and fitness. According to the Centers for Disease Control, four out of five U.S. adults do not meet guidelines for healthy physical activity. Research by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid … Continue reading

Tweets Of The Day – Monday, May 27th

Today’s tweets are about health, fitness, social media, start-ups and New York City.

Not Competitive – Healthcare In The United States – Infographic

The United States spent $2.6 trillion on health care in 2010 – more than any other country in the world. Yet based on research from a collaborative effort within the National Academy of Sciences, Americans live shorter lives and experience more injuries and illnesses than people in similar high-income countries. Continue reading

Health: How Stress Can Affect Your Life. Destress – Infographic

This infographic provides a deeper look into stress and how it can affect your life.

– Stress in the US has increased 30% over the last three decades.
– 35% of American workers are CHRONICALLY stressed this year Continue reading

How Women Are Set Up For Eating Disorders – Infographic

Eating disorders are the most deadly mental illness and statistics indicate that various media outlets are partially to blame. This infographic illustrates the disparity between the media’s portrayal of a physically “ideal” woman and the actual average American woman. These statistics reveal that the way that the fashion and advertising industries influence women’s self-image. Continue reading

52 Million People Uninsured: Health Insurance Facts – Infographic

Insurance in general is a complicated subject with many ever-changing parts. Health insurance is one of the most popular (if not the most popular) types of insurance in America today and directly affects the life of every person in this country. In the infographic below, you will find some not so well known statistics and facts about health insurance and healthcare today.

SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS

The U.S. spent 2.47 trillion dollars on health care in 2009 and it is being projected that it will spend 4.5 trillion dollars on health care in 2019.

41% of working age Americans either have medical bill problems or are currently paying off medical debt. Medical bills are a major factor in more that 60% of the personal bankruptcies in the United States. Of those, 75% of them involved individuals that actually DID have health insurance.

Over the last decade, the number of Americans without health insurance has risen from about 28 million to about 52 million. Today, 18% of Americans are uninsured.

Women pay approximately 30% more for health insurance.

Source: Enhance Insurance

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Soccer, That Beautiful Game, Eases Hypertension | Playbook | Wired.com

Soccer is more than a beautiful game — it’s good for your heart, too. A European study found three out of four hypertensive men who played the game two hours a week saw their blood pressure fall to healthy levels in six months. Photo: toksuede/Flickr

Soccer, That Beautiful Game, Eases Hypertension | Playbook | Wired.com.

The beautiful game just got a bit prettier.

A study out of Europe has shown that playing soccer might be the best way for men with hypertension to improve their blood pressure and decrease the risk of stroke while keeping fit. The study adds to our understanding of the game’s health benefits.

We’ve long known exercise brings all kinds of medical benefits, and Peter Krustrup of the lab of Sport and Health Sciences has long studied the effect of soccer on cardiorespiratory capacity, metabolic fitness and muscle and bone strength. He and his team have compared the sport to running and weight training because it is estimated that some 400 million people play it worldwide.

Their work has provided insight into the benefits of different exercises. Jogging was effective for losing fat and improving cardiovascular health, while strength training promotes musculoskeletal adaptations like posture, balance, strength and bone mineralization. Soccer, on the other hand, provides all of those benefits.

“Soccer is very effective both in terms of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal adaptations,” said Krustrup. “Soccer is an intense, variable, all-in-one training.”

Building upon that, the latest research by Krustup and researchers in England — where almost one in three men has hypertension — and Denmark found the game helps prevent cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men with hypertension. Three out of four hypertensive men in the study saw their blood pressure fall to healthy levels after six months of soccer.

“Playing soccer scores a hat trick for men with hypertension,” Krustup said. “It reduces blood pressure, improves fitness and burns fat.”

Although everyone knows exercise can reduce blood pressure, there’s been little exploration of the best activity to prescribe. Krustup was interested in determining whether soccer, the world’s most popular sport, might be especially effective.

It should be noted that his study was financed by the Danish Soccer Federation, along with the FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Center and the Danish Heart Foundation. So it’s no surprise that it would focus on soccer. But it’s also worth noting that soccer is far more popular than, say, basketball or American football, and Krustup says he wants to investigate these “intermittent team sports” in the future.

In his study, published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Krustrup and his team gathered 33 men aged 33 to 54 with mild to moderate hypertension and divided them randomly into two groups. One participated in two one-hour sessions of soccer training each week, while the other followed the advice — get active, eat well — typically offered by a general practitioner.

The groups were tested at three months and six months to determine their blood pressure, body fat, oxygen intake and other factors. The soccer players saw their average mean blood pressure reduced by 10 mmHg, twice that of the control group. Their maximum oxygen uptake and exercise capacity rose 10 percent, and their resting heart rates was lowered by eight beats per minute. Body fat dropped by an average of two kilograms, and they were found to be less tired during exercise than those in the control group, though it isn’t surprising that the people who enjoyed intense workouts for six months were fitter.

“The magnitude of response was impressive,” Krustrup said, “with reductions of 13/8 mmHg which is somewhat more than the average effects seen after endurance training for hypertensive men, like running (7/5 mmHg) and much more than what has been reported after strength training.”

Those in the control group also saw lower blood pressure, but the improvement was not nearly so pronounced, nor did they enjoy any of the other benefits the soccer players did. The next step calls for studying how soccer affects the heart’s structure and function.

Source: WiredNews

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The Rise Of Mobile Health Management Tools, Smartphones: Smarter Healthcare – Infographic

Extreme smartphone use can certainly lead to strained eyes and stiff necks. That’s the bad news. The good news? The mobile device you just can’t live without can also help facilitate better health in new, more convenient ways than ever before.

How? The rise of mobile health apps and other tools. There are currently about 40,000 mobile health apps available for tablets and smartphones, and over 500 health projects worldwide that have a mobile emphasis.

That’s according to the online health care education portal AlliedHealthWorld.com, which pulled information from a variety of sources around the web to show just how much of a positive impact smartphones can have on our well-being.

In fact, if you use exercise apps such as Runkeeper, access health records electronically or participate in wellness gamification programs, you may already be experiencing mobile’s health benefits without even realizing it. One analysis indicates that the number of people who downloaded a mobile health app in 2012 will nearly double to 247 million from last year. What can those apps do? Diet, exercise, sleep and blood pressure are just a few of the many areas covered.

All that usage is leading to mainstream recognition, too. The United States Food and Drug Administration last year began paving the way for mobile apps that ensure health claims pass an approval process before becoming available to the consumer market.

For more on how smartphones and mobile technology are changing health care, check out the infographic.

Source: Mashable.com, Allied Health World

Sugar Consumption And Health – Infographic

The consumption of sugar will always be an issue for nutritionists and health buffs everywhere. As long as sugar remains a large part of the American diet, we will continue to hear about all the negative effects sugar can have on the body. As someone who is studying nursing, it’ll be important to understand how the overconsumption of sugar may cause many health problems in the future. Many may ask: Is this concern exaggerated? Absolutely not. Sugar is in everything and it has contributed to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States. Since 1990, sugar intake has increased by 40 lbs a year. Is it a coincidence that the obesity rate has increased by 20 percent? As a nurse, you will see many cases in which a reduction of sugar intake could have gone a long way to ensuring less visits to the hospital. It’ll be important as a nurse to educate your patients on why sugar is bad and why they should limit their consumption of sugar. This infographic will show you just how getting your daily sugar fix may be contributing to many short term and long term health issues.

Source: Online Nursing Programs

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Increase Productivity With A Nap – Infographic

Exhausted from the mid-week slump? Not the folks at Huffington Post, whose office has not one but two nap rooms. Founder Arianna Huffington advocates for all things sleep-related and for good reason — naps can decrease drowsiness, increase alertness and benefit a person’s overall health.

As this illustration from Daily Infographic shows, humans consolidate sleeping time for a long period at night, but we’re designed to feel tired in the early morning hours and mid-afternoon, when a 2 p.m. nap would feel awesome. A 2- to 5-minute nap can perk you up and a 5- to 20-minute nap can improve your motor skills and performance. Siesta, anyone?

Source: Daily Infographics, Mashable.com, patio productions

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What You Need To Know About Sunscreen – Infographic

Most people know they should use sunscreen to protect themselves from the sun’s harmful rays. Unfortunately, few are fully aware of how to properly use sunscreen. This is particularly true of athletes who train and compete in the sun throughout the summer.

If you’re spending long hours in the heat this summer, sunscreen could become your most important piece of training equipment. Check out the graphic below to learn how to select the right SPF, understand application and find out how different conditions impact the need to use and reapply sunscreen. Don’t find yourself sunburned on the sideline this summer because you failed to educate yourself on how to properly use sunscreen.

Source: Stack