Tag Archives: iOS

Developers Revenue Wars: iOS vs. Android – Infographic

It’s billed as the battle of the century, at least as far as app developers are concerned; which has better ROI, Apple’s iOS or Google’s Android? Consumers are split: Apple have the single largest market share, Google have numerous manufacturers on their side; iOS dominates North America, Android wins out in Europe. Continue reading

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OS War: Is Android Really Beating iOS? – Infographic

Check out the latest figures on the Google Android and Apple iOS mobile operating systems. Continue reading

App Developers: The Differences You Need To Know Between Android And iOS Users – Infographic

With Android and iPhone now combining for nearly 90 percent of the U.S. smartphone market, many app developers are concentrating their efforts on serving the majority of smartphone users through these two platforms. But there is an inherent tension when resources are limited and developers must choose one over the other, or decide which platform to develop for first. As a result, every app developer should be armed with some basic facts around the differences between Android and iPhone users when making these decisions. Continue reading

iOS Version History: A Visual Timeline – Infographic

This infographic aims to capture the iOS evolution, milestone by milestone, version by version, throughout the history of Apple’s platform. From June 29, 2007 – the release of the first iPhone – to the rumored future of iOS in June 2013, we’ve captured all the major milestones, feature updates and hardware releases. Continue reading
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Research group API has released its forecast for mobile handsets in 2013. Android will keep its lead in handsets and iOS will continue to dominate in tablets. Microsoft and BlackBerry will remain in the smartphones game with small shares of the … Continue reading

How Long Does It Take To Build A Mobile App? – Infographic

“How long does it take to build a mobile app?” While the question isn’t as timeless as “How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop?” (spoiler alert: 3481), it is one that’s very dear to our community of mobile app developers. And now we’ve got an answer. 18 weeks.

In collaboration with research firm AYTM, we surveyed 100 mobile designers to discover how long they expected it would take to build core front- and backend components of an Android or iOS app.  We averaged the responses and then teamed with the designers at Visual.ly to visualize the time required to develop each component of an MVP-quality native app.

For fun, we put app development time in context. Who knew you could drill three 3000-foot oil wells in the time it takes to launch the first version of your “drill for oil” iOS game?

Of course, there’s a subtext to this graphic. Specifically, it doesn’t have to take 18 weeks to build v1 of your app. It can take a lot less time. The backend alone is estimated to require 10 weeks, but a backend as a service like Kinvey can dramatically reduce that time. And our SDK partners, like Adobe PhoneGap, BrightCove and Trigger.io, can all help accelerate your frontend development efforts as well.

Source: Kinvey

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Apple vs Android: Mobile Phone Security – Apps And Hijacks – Infographics

You could be carrying a virus with you everywhere you go. This new strand doesn’t target the immune system, but rather the operating system — on your smartphone.

Smartphone usage has skyrocketed over the past few years. There are now more than 1 billion active smartphones, or one for every seven people on the planet. Because of their immense popularity, smartphones have become a main target for nefarious hackers looking to spread malware and steal personal information.

The main avenue for viruses to infect smartphones is through third-party apps. There are over one million apps combined for the two most popular mobile operating systems, Google’s Android and Apple’s iOS.

Many hacked apps, often made to look like popular apps, are rigged with malware. More than 90% of the top-selling Android and iOS apps have hacked versions available for download on torrent sites and other unofficial platforms, according to a study by Arxan, a mobile security company.

Up to this point, Apple seems to be doing a better job protecting its mobile users against cyber threats. The iPhone has never seen a virus, and its only spam app was removed. Conversely, 75% of smartphone malware targets Android devices, according to F-Secure.

One probable reason hackers target Android over Apple is that the former enjoys a much greater share of the smartphone market. More than 50% of all smartphone users employ the Android OS, while Apple’s market share is closer to 30%. With far more people using Android devices, a virus has the ability to do much greater damage.

For more on mobile app security and how the top two operating systems stack up, check out the following infographic, created by Ladbrokes Games.

Source: Mashable.com

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Do You Trust Your Mobile Apps? Better Take A Look – Infographic

Mobile apps sure are handy little doodads, telling you what’s going on, where to go and who’s nearby. But can they be trusted with your privacy?

Facebook and Google aren’t the only connected services that should have your privacy antennae up. The mobile devices that travel with you nearly everywhere also gather plenty of dirt — and you might be surprised who else has access to that dirt.

What do you need to be aware of? According to the application security firm Veracode, there are four levels of risk to watch out for. Some apps with malicious code can access your data and device sensors. Other times, your information can be intercepted if you use mobile Wi-Fi. Jailbroken iPhone and Android apps can penetrate your operating system. And bad guys can use faulty firmware to gain administrative access to your device itself…Read More

Source: Veracode, Mashable.com

FTC investigating agreements between Apple and Google…

Kindle Adds Periodicals to iOS Apps: But Will Consumers Read Them?

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via Kindle Adds Periodicals to iOS Apps: But Will Consumers Read Them?.