Tag Archives: Measure

Performance Measure: Facebook Page Averages For August 2013 – Infographic

the-average-facebook-page-performance-for-august-2013_524561e7710d9

 

 

A new month, a new average Facebook page performance infographic. Compare your Facebook page with the numbers of other pages with the same size for August.

Source: Quintly

4 Metrics to Measure Social Media’s ROI

4 Metrics to Measure Social Media’s ROI.

How do marketers begin to measure ROI in social media? After all, likes, follows, and repins are not among our usual business KPIs. At the same time, the standard business metrics we typically use to gauge digital success don’t apply easily to social media; ROI can’t be measured in clicks and impressions in this realm. It’s still early days for social, and we haven’t yet discovered a silver bullet to solve the measurement conundrum.

 

That said, there are a few metrics that marketers should pay close attention to in order to gauge whether their efforts and initiatives in social are moving the needle for their brands.

 

As you look to 2013 and start building your case for marketing dollars, consider the following metrics and related critical questions:

 

  • Share of voice. How does your brand’s presence stack up against your competitive set in terms of not just audience size (number of fans, followers, pinners, etc.), but level of engagement? How engaged are your customers compared to your competitors? How many people are talking about your brand, in what context, and how frequently?
  • Conversations. Are you having conversations with your customers? If not, you need to re-examine your content strategy — conversations put the “social” in social media. Stop speaking at your audience and start speaking with them. Creating dialogues will increase your brand affinity and begin to tip the revenue scales in your favor.
  • Advocates. Do you have any “super fans” or “super followers”? If you do, are you leveraging their passion for your brand? If not, you are missing out on a huge opportunity to dial up your earned media and tap into extended audiences who may not use your brand today, but may now be compelled to try it, thanks to Aunt Susie’s glowing recommendation. These wonderful brand ambassadors may be among your fans, simply waiting for you to notice, engage and activate them.
  • Product guidance. Are you asking your customers questions to learn what they like or dislike about your product or service? Social provides marketers and enterprises access to a huge, free real-time focus group. Organizations need to leverage social networks to help guide product direction, because in the end it will save your company from making timely and costly mistakes. Often you don’t even need to ask; simply listen. As an example, Lands’ End recently changed the zipper on one of its popular children’s jackets, and the comments about the poor quality of the new zipper were deafening in the social space. Lands’ End may not have asked, but I can’t imagine that it hasn’t heard the overwhelming response. I strongly suspect it will be bringing back the old zipper next year.

 

Clearly, social ROI is far more complex than a simple cost vs. brand lift equation. Social just doesn’t fit the current marketing funnel, so we need to stop trying to cram it in there. It’s a square peg/round hole scenario. While social certainly can affect the funnel or customer journey (whichever model you subscribe to), it can’t be superimposed over it. There are just too many touchpoints in too many places, and too many variables to limit social to one fixed point or another along the customer’s path.

 

The ROI of social media is really delayed ROI. I know that’s tough for a lot of marketers to swallow, but again it goes back to the marketing funnel. It’s not just another advertising channel: it’s a critical part of a company’s overall communications platform, CRM solution, and research and development efforts. It goes way beyond marketing, touching multiple departments and roles within an organization, from customer support retweets all the way up to the CEO’s blog posts.

 

So, when it comes to social, marketers need to stop being hyper-focused on the immediate ROI question (I know, it’s hard!) and instead get management teams focused on another question: What have I learned today from my customers?

 

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, mattjeacock

 

 

This article originally published at ClickZ here.

 

ClickZ is a Mashable publishing partner that provides marketing news and expert advice.

Source: Mashable.com

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The Social Media Marketing Industry – Infographic

Our Infographic “Social Media Marketing Industry” covers the latest Social Media Trends, Social Media Challenges, Strategy of social media marketers and lot more.

Infographic by – GO-Globe.com

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Social Media Marketing And Social Media Engagement Must Be Measured – Infographic

Understanding different aspects of social media could be an intricate task. Considering all the major platforms – Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google + and others – marketing your brand socially requires a comprehensive approach; much more than just understanding one platform or one metric. Because social media involves a great deal of human interaction in its entire complexity, aggregating results to just one digit would be grossly inaccurate and frankly impossible. That is why many of our customers have already decided to use a dashboard which includes multiple metrics for measuring each of these social networks and different aspects of their performance.

In social, you need to measure different things:

Fan growth, posts from you, your fans interactions (At Socialbakers we refer to this as Engagement), your users’ wall posts, and the speed of your response determine your social success. Since all of the above metrics are public, you can and more importantly shoud analyze these metrics for your competitors as well. Social media conversations (and logically marcomms) take place in an open environment, and learning form successes (and failures) of your direct or indirect competition, is something that just works to improve your engagement and fine-tune your social marketing tactics! Additionally, there are metrics that are strictly platforms based, like Facebook Insights, which for example include “reach” or “talking fans”.

The best metric for benchmarking: Engagement Rate

We at Socialbakers believe and our clients’ successes stand as proof that the best way to compare social performance is to analyze Engagement Rates. The beauty of this calculation is that it can be applied for any social network that uses public data, such as Twitter and Google +! The formulas for average Engagement Rates are:

It’s true that Average Post Engagement Rates can range from 0.01% to 1%, but people keep forgetting thats the people interacting, and that its for every post. If 1% of people interact with EVERY one of your posts, that means a majority of your fans have seen it. So it’s the exact reason why Engagement Rate is a metric worth monitoring!

Source: socialbakers.com

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Scoring Klout – How Klout Works – Infographic

By Shea Bennett on June 29, 2012 6:00 AM

Are you a fan of Klout?

Perhaps, like me, you’re a skeptic. Perhaps you’ve heard of Klout, but don’t really know how it works. Perhaps you use Klout, but don’t know much about it. Perhaps you want to use Klout, need more information, but are trapped under something heavy.

Boy, have we got the infographic for you.

Everyone has influence, and Klout has made it their mission to tell each of us what that is. They accomplish this by using data from your social networks to gauge your Klout Score, which is a number between 1 and 100. The average Klout score is actually 20, so anything above this means you have more Klout than your common or garden social networker. And as your score increases, it becomes exponentially harder to increase your Klout.

Why would you want to do this? Well, that’s the $64,000 question. Cynics say that your Klout score only really matters to other Klout users, but folks who boast a high number can receive all manner of perks and freebies (although that’s mostly limited to those lucky folks in Silicon Valley the U.S.). Everybody likes perks and freebies, so many people try really hard to boost their score, which makes them more attractive to perk-providing brands, plus anyone impressed by a high Klout number, who the brands hope to target. Rinse and repeat.

Yeah, it’s all one big circle jerk. But however you feel – and I hope I haven’t influenced you in any way – knowledge is power, so this infographic might help to pull the curtain away from exactly what it is that they do to calculate your Klout score. Whether that makes the service any more valuable is something that you will have to decide. But I will say this: any system that determines that a 17-year old Canadian teenybopper has more online credibility than the political leader of the free world needs to be taken with a very hefty pinch.

And me? My Klout score says I’m more influential than Pepsi. In your face, sugar water. In your face.

Source: Shea Bennett, mediabistro.com, thedegree360.com