Tag Archives: Metrics

Marketing Metrics Overload: What Really Matters – Infographic

Don’t Get Caught Up In The Data Madness

Data and metrics are everywhere these days, making it easy to compile numbers on nearly any topic, from email marketing and lead generation to social media and digital campaigns. But often these marketing metrics are not actionable and can lead to misinformed business decisions. It is important to keep in mind that in excess, metrics may become cumbersome, overburdening, and may even lead to a false sense of success. Continue reading

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Content Marketing has seen a tremendous surge in popularity over the past two years. It has gone from industry buzzword to an indispensable part of marketing strategies, big and small. But how are marketers approaching and measuring their strategies? The … Continue reading

Search Engine Marketing – The Google AdWords Economy: CPCs, CTRs, Ad Impressions, Conversion Rates… – Infographic

Search Engine Marketing – The Google AdWords Economy: CPCs, CTRs, Ad Impressions, Conversion Rates… [Infographic] : MarketingProfs Article.

After Google announced its “disappointing” 2012 third-quarter revenues of $10.8 billion via AdWords ads, WordStream released findings from an analysis of the economics of Google’s AdWords platform in an attempt find out how Google makes more than $100 million a day with search advertising.

WordStream founder and CTO Larry Kim “looked at 2,600 AdWords advertising accounts—examining key metrics like the total number of number of clicks, impressions, costs (etc.) for all of the accounts in the date range of July 1, 2012 to September 30, 2012.”

Among his findings: “Average costs per click (CPCs) have declined significantly…(-16.5% for Google Search, -18.2% for Google Display Network), while click-through rates (CTR) were mixed (-12.4% for Google Search, +13.8% for Google Display Network).

“Offsetting those declines are an impressive growth of ad impressions and clicks (clicks were up +21.6% for Google Search, +29.1% for Google Display Network), which more than made up for lost revenues.”

Which industries spent the most on Google ads in 3Q12? The top 10 are as follows:

  1. Finance
  2. Travel
  3. Shopping
  4. Jobs and education
  5. Internet and telecommunications
  6. Computers and electronics
  7. Business and industrial
  8. Home and garden
  9. Autos and vehicles
  10. Beauty and fitness

Social Media Engagement Is A Real Metric – Infographic

Did you know that the average engagement rates for posts made on social media sites range from just 0.01 to 1 percent?

Independent studies I’ve undertaken have confirmed this. In my opinion, if your engagement rates are better than half a percent you’re WAY above average, and around five times as engaged as even the biggest players in the social space.

So is it all a waste of time?

Not at all. Those breadcrumbs add up. If even a small percentage of your audience interacts with each and every one of your posts, over time your impact will reach a very sizeable chunk of your network. The key part is you have to keep pushing, putting one tweet in front of another.

This infographic from Social Bakers takes a closer look at why engagement is a real metric in social media.

Source: Social Bakers, Media Bistro

4 Metrics to Measure Social Media’s ROI

4 Metrics to Measure Social Media’s ROI.

How do marketers begin to measure ROI in social media? After all, likes, follows, and repins are not among our usual business KPIs. At the same time, the standard business metrics we typically use to gauge digital success don’t apply easily to social media; ROI can’t be measured in clicks and impressions in this realm. It’s still early days for social, and we haven’t yet discovered a silver bullet to solve the measurement conundrum.

 

That said, there are a few metrics that marketers should pay close attention to in order to gauge whether their efforts and initiatives in social are moving the needle for their brands.

 

As you look to 2013 and start building your case for marketing dollars, consider the following metrics and related critical questions:

 

  • Share of voice. How does your brand’s presence stack up against your competitive set in terms of not just audience size (number of fans, followers, pinners, etc.), but level of engagement? How engaged are your customers compared to your competitors? How many people are talking about your brand, in what context, and how frequently?
  • Conversations. Are you having conversations with your customers? If not, you need to re-examine your content strategy — conversations put the “social” in social media. Stop speaking at your audience and start speaking with them. Creating dialogues will increase your brand affinity and begin to tip the revenue scales in your favor.
  • Advocates. Do you have any “super fans” or “super followers”? If you do, are you leveraging their passion for your brand? If not, you are missing out on a huge opportunity to dial up your earned media and tap into extended audiences who may not use your brand today, but may now be compelled to try it, thanks to Aunt Susie’s glowing recommendation. These wonderful brand ambassadors may be among your fans, simply waiting for you to notice, engage and activate them.
  • Product guidance. Are you asking your customers questions to learn what they like or dislike about your product or service? Social provides marketers and enterprises access to a huge, free real-time focus group. Organizations need to leverage social networks to help guide product direction, because in the end it will save your company from making timely and costly mistakes. Often you don’t even need to ask; simply listen. As an example, Lands’ End recently changed the zipper on one of its popular children’s jackets, and the comments about the poor quality of the new zipper were deafening in the social space. Lands’ End may not have asked, but I can’t imagine that it hasn’t heard the overwhelming response. I strongly suspect it will be bringing back the old zipper next year.

 

Clearly, social ROI is far more complex than a simple cost vs. brand lift equation. Social just doesn’t fit the current marketing funnel, so we need to stop trying to cram it in there. It’s a square peg/round hole scenario. While social certainly can affect the funnel or customer journey (whichever model you subscribe to), it can’t be superimposed over it. There are just too many touchpoints in too many places, and too many variables to limit social to one fixed point or another along the customer’s path.

 

The ROI of social media is really delayed ROI. I know that’s tough for a lot of marketers to swallow, but again it goes back to the marketing funnel. It’s not just another advertising channel: it’s a critical part of a company’s overall communications platform, CRM solution, and research and development efforts. It goes way beyond marketing, touching multiple departments and roles within an organization, from customer support retweets all the way up to the CEO’s blog posts.

 

So, when it comes to social, marketers need to stop being hyper-focused on the immediate ROI question (I know, it’s hard!) and instead get management teams focused on another question: What have I learned today from my customers?

 

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, mattjeacock

 

 

This article originally published at ClickZ here.

 

ClickZ is a Mashable publishing partner that provides marketing news and expert advice.

Source: Mashable.com

Social Media Business Engagement…