Tag Archives: Search

Is Google Search A Monopoly? – Infographic

Google certainly dominates the search market. But is it actually a monopoly or is just outpacing competitors (like Bing) when it comes to innovation? Continue reading

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The Evolution Of The Search Engine – Infographic

Search engines made their debut 20 years ago. Today, enterprise businesses not only rely on web search engines to get visitors to their websites, but on-site search has become a vital feature of virtually every website. Continue reading
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Topics in this Infographic/Article: Search, Organic Search, B2B Marketing, Traffic, Lead, Social Media, Online Marketing We released our 2012 B2B Marketing Benchmark Report, and we decided to create an infographic that will highlight some of the more interesting data points … Continue reading

Siri VS. Google Voice Search – Infographic

The mobile wars are heating up again with Google and Apple going head to head in what many believe to be one of the most important technology battles yet: Apple’s Siri vs. Google Voice Search. Think you know everything about this battling duo? Check out this infographic to find out how it all began, the incredible amount of money spent on mobile patents, and some of the key differences in their approach to delivering mobile solutions. We even pitted Apple and Google against each other in a head-to-head match. Who came out on top? The results might surprise you! Continue reading

Future Of Search: Google Search VS. Facebook Graph Search – Infographic

Facebook has recently introduced Graph Search which brings the long due innovation in internet searching and suddenly makes Google look broken. It is based on natural language instead of Google’s keyword based search; it provides you with personalized search results that exactly match your needs; it understands – for the most part – what you mean by a search query instead of mindlessly matching the keywords; and a lot more. Continue reading

Guide For Mobile Advertisers – Infographic

Mobile search is on the rise. This infographic provides an advertiser’s guide to mobile as well as a breakdown of the top three mobile searches.

Source: Visual.ly, Startapp.com

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Marketing: How Important Is SEO? – Infographic

Regardless of age, race, income or gender most of us are using search engines every day. Online business needs search engine traffic to thrive. Proper SEO is essential for getting found online.

Source: Visual.ly

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SEO And Search In Business Gain Importance – Infographic

The search engine optimization industry is advancing. And rapidly, too. As businesses demand greater online visibility and recognition, the value and influence of successful SEO within organizations is expected to reach unprecedented heights.

Source: mavenlink

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The Hidden Value Of Long Tail SEO – Infographic

Long Tail SEO goes somewhat unnoticed. This graphic highlights the benefits to Long Tail keywords.

Source: Visual.ly

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The New SEO Rules In A Content Marketing World

The New SEO Rules in a Content Marketing World.

Shane Snow is a Mashable contributor and cofounder of Contently, which builds tools for journalists and brand publishers.

Five years ago, it seemed nothing was as buzzy and mysterious as SEO. Today, “content marketing” has taken over as reigning buzzphrase in marketing circles, with many SEO practitioners shifting their sales pitches to match the trend.

The difference, essentially, is content marketing aims to create content humans want to read, whereas SEO aims to create content that pleases search engines. The two aren’t mutually exclusive, but not long ago creating cheap, machine-friendly garbage for SEO was as effective as putting time and money into quality content.

Not anymore.

Many bloggers and publishers today are seeing traffic from social exceed that from search engines; social sites like Pinterest, for example, are now top traffic sources for some retailers.

Yet, Google still gets 100 billion searches every month, according to Search Engine Watch. Publishers angling for social media traffic would be foolish to ignore search entirely.

How can content marketing organizations remain search-friendly while adhering to best practices in social media?

The New Rules of SEO for Content Marketing

Rand Fishkin, CEO of SEOmoz, outlines five best practices for content marketers hoping to maximize SEO value in an ethical way.

  1. Create content that people will have an incentive to share.
  2. Do keyword research, so you don’t waste effort writing about things people don’t care about.
  3. Put all your content on the same domain/subdomain. (e.g. don’t use blog.mysite.com, use mysite.com/blog)
  4. Stand for something, and write about it. People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.
  5. Don’t separate your brand from your content. For instance, casino sites that make fascinating infographics about animal rights aren’t going to last long.

Successful content marketing publications rely heavily on social traffic for timely impressions. They build search rank for their archives almost as a byproduct of good social content. Well-ranked branded publications like RedBull.com adhere to Fishkin’s advice of producing “large amounts of content people find interesting,” combined with “solid UX” and SEO basics: clean URLs and smart markup.

Machiavellian SEO Doesn’t Work Anymore

Just as in traditional journalism, content marketers should never seek to betray or deceive readers, whether through SEO practices or their content. Anything that borders on sneaky or unethical eventually gets filtered out of search engine results, if history is any indication.

“Manipulative techniques like 301’ing old sites, hordes of anchor text rich links, exact match domains, etc. are gone,” Fishkin says. “SEO today is holistic. It demands that you build signals real brands have that, in years past, could be artificially overwhelmed by large quantities of links or other tactics.”

Search engine algorithms constantly improve to defeat what amounts to cheating — sending false signals of real popularity, like link trading schemes. Today’s algorithms even factor sharing into their search rankings, so users can blissfully skip over crappy content.

Syndication and Influencer Content Works

High-growth blogs tend to focus on content distribution — getting their stories and headlines on other blogs or news sites across the web. Done well, this can build honest links to a site, indicating to Google that brands with authority trust a site’s content enough to publish it on their own. Plus, other blogs tend to riff off of popular posts on authority sites, which can solidify search trust.

Additionally, inviting influential writers and publishers to guest post on your site not only encourages traffic, but also boosts social signals when those influencers share your domain with their social media followers.

At the end of the day, good SEO is baked into good content.

Says Fishkin, “Delivering an exceptional experience and building a true web brand are now essential to long-term SEO success.”

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, Ekspansio

The Change Of SEO – Infographic

SEO has now matured and emerged as a fully fledged digital marketing channel. It’s challenge like other marketing channels is to reach and engage with a target audience before optimisation for search engines. This infographic we have put together details both the OLD Vs. NEW approaches to SEO. It demonstrates how SEO is now a multi faceted discipline of digital marketing.

Source: Visual.ly

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Google Decline In China Continues As Its Search Share Falls To 4th Place, Maps To 6th

It’s been more than two and a half years since Google left the Chinese search market, and the market share for its search and maps segments has continued to wane.

Marbridge Daily recently called attention to October search engine numbers from CNZZ that put Google at fourth place with 4.72 percent of page views, down from 5.1 percent the month before. Part of the reason for the slide was the arrival of search newcomer Qihoo 360, which was believed to have capture 9.64 percent of the market last month.

Qihoo launched its search engine in August and quickly jumped into second place. CEO Zhou Yongyi has set his sights on a 15 to 20 percent share of the market, enough to “destroy” Baidu’s monopoly. Baidu isn’t taking this lying down, though, as it has sparred with Qihoo over links to its site. Baidu’s share of visits was estimated at 72.97 percent, down from around 75 percent in September.

Last week, the Chinese government called a meeting representatives from the major search players to have them sign an agreement for fair competition. One specific issue was adherence to the robot.txt protocol that instructs search engines whether to crawl a site. Qihoo has faced accusations that it was copying search results and ignoring the robot.txt file.

Google also suffered a blow to its Google Maps platform in China last quarter. Mobisights reports that the search engine’s mapping service is now in sixth place in the country with just 9 percent share. It saw a steep drop in the third quarter, largely because of Apple’s decision to swap out Google Maps in iOS 6. In China, the iOS Maps application uses Autonavi’s data.

Autonavi ranks first among mapping services in China with an estimated 25.9 percent market share. Baidu is in second with 19.1 percent. In an effort to strengthen its mobile revenue, Baidu is investing heavy resources in improving its Maps product and it has spun off its Location-Based Services division into its own unit.

Image credit: Li Xin / AFP / Getty Images

 

via Google decline in China continues as its search share falls to 4th place, maps to 6th – The Next Web.

Quick Look: Why You Should Use Video In Your Marketing – Infographic

Why you should use video in your marketing strategy. Build Trust, Search Results, Sharing, and Mobile.

Source: Visual.ly

Search Engine Marketing – The Google AdWords Economy: CPCs, CTRs, Ad Impressions, Conversion Rates… – Infographic

Search Engine Marketing – The Google AdWords Economy: CPCs, CTRs, Ad Impressions, Conversion Rates… [Infographic] : MarketingProfs Article.

After Google announced its “disappointing” 2012 third-quarter revenues of $10.8 billion via AdWords ads, WordStream released findings from an analysis of the economics of Google’s AdWords platform in an attempt find out how Google makes more than $100 million a day with search advertising.

WordStream founder and CTO Larry Kim “looked at 2,600 AdWords advertising accounts—examining key metrics like the total number of number of clicks, impressions, costs (etc.) for all of the accounts in the date range of July 1, 2012 to September 30, 2012.”

Among his findings: “Average costs per click (CPCs) have declined significantly…(-16.5% for Google Search, -18.2% for Google Display Network), while click-through rates (CTR) were mixed (-12.4% for Google Search, +13.8% for Google Display Network).

“Offsetting those declines are an impressive growth of ad impressions and clicks (clicks were up +21.6% for Google Search, +29.1% for Google Display Network), which more than made up for lost revenues.”

Which industries spent the most on Google ads in 3Q12? The top 10 are as follows:

  1. Finance
  2. Travel
  3. Shopping
  4. Jobs and education
  5. Internet and telecommunications
  6. Computers and electronics
  7. Business and industrial
  8. Home and garden
  9. Autos and vehicles
  10. Beauty and fitness

Marissa Mayer Pledges to Take Yahoo Back to Its Roots

Marissa Mayer Pledges to Take Yahoo Back to Its Roots.

Marissa Mayer outlined her plans for Yahoo’s future in her first earnings call as CEO of the beleaguered digital media enterprise. The company’s third-quarter earnings were better than expected: Earnings-per-share were 35 cents on revenue of $1.09 billion, compared to analysts’ estimates of 26 cents per share on revenue of $1.08 billion.

Mayer began the call by talking about recent changes to Yahoo’s culture, which has a new commitment to “open dialogue” and “transparency.” Employees’ quarterly individual goals have been mapped to company goals. They have also been given free phones and free food in an effort to make Yahoo “the absolute best place to work.”

Mayer identified Yahoo’s “core products” as search, mail, ads, mobile, news and the homepage — in that order. She emphasized that Yahoo would not change direction dramatically; rather, “[we’re] going back to our roots as a consumer Internet company focused on consumer experience,” she said.

“I don’t think there’s a giant pivot… I think this is about improved execution,” she added.

Mobile came up repeatedly during the call. “Some point in the future Yahoo will have to be a predominantly mobile company,” Mayer acknowledged, adding that Yahoo needed more mobile engineers. She noted that the company recently deployed a redesigned mobile search page across 23 pages, “resulting in increased usage,” and that an update to Flickr for Android received “rave reviews.”

One analyst asked Mayer whether Yahoo would go after more of the local ad market. “Local … is very hard to do well,” she said, and as the former head of local services at Google, she would know. “I think our local offerings are good at the moment [and] I think it’s hard to take that next step to provide even deeper functionality … [It’s] probably not an area where we’re going to invest moving forward,” she said.

Mayer and new CFO Ken Goldman both suggested that Yahoo’s search partnership with Microsoft has been less than satisfactory, but did not elaborate on their plans to address it.

Goldman did not issue fourth-quarter guidance, saying he had not been with the company long enough. (His first day was today.)

Many had expected Mayer to announce some acquisitions — namely, that of restaurant reservation service OpenTable, and possibly advertising tool PubMatic and mobile ad company Millennial Media. Mayer said Yahoo does not “have particular acquisitions in mind today” and that any future acquisitions would be “less than $100 million.”

Image courtesy of Flickr, jolieodell

Source: Mashable.com

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