Tag Archives: Wall Street

Wall Street A-Twitter Over IPO

Algorithmic Finance: Decoding Wall Street – Infographic

QC

Penguin, Panda, Google, algorithms. Usually, when the word algorithm comes into play, most people think about Google, search and keywords.

Algorithms are also used in the world of Wall Street and its money makers. In the past 10 years algorithmic trading has become a huge factor in trading and investing.

This infographic explains the industry of algorithmic finance, offering insight into how it works, the prevalence, and different kinds of algorithms used for investment.

Source: QuantConnect

The Five Dumbest Things on Wall Street – April

Corruption at Corrections Corp., Carnival’s bruises and a 5 Dumbest shout-out to Boston are among Gregg Greenberg’s standouts this week.

Emails Are Forever: Wall Street’s Weak Spot

Bloomberg Contributing Editor Bill Cohan discusses the permanence of email records at financial firms. He speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Market Makers.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Wall Street, Take Foot Off Tim Cook’s Throat

Gamco Investors CIO of Growth Equities Howard Ward discusses his outlook for Apple and his investment strategy. He speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Money Moves.” (Source: Bloomberg)

How Apple Ate Wall Street

How Apple ate Wall Street – MarketWatch.

Mutual-fund investors aren’t supposed to have to pay attention to the fate of any particular stock. But like so many things with technology giant Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL)  , the regular rules don’t seem to apply.

 

While Apple’s stock has been hit hard in recent months — losing more than third of its value since September, including a 12% drop since missing earnings estimates on Wednesday — the Cupertino, Calif.-based company is still the most valuable name on the stock market. That distinction means it looms unusually large in millions of Americans’ investment portfolios, even if they’ve never glanced at one of its quarterly earnings reports. “We’ve never seen another company have as big an impact” on overall market returns, says Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst at S&P Dow Jones Indices.

Just how popular has Apple become? It was among the top 10 holdings in more than 1,000 mutual funds last year, according to fund researcher Morningstar Inc. — up from just 11 in 2002, shortly after Apple introduced the device that started the gadget craze, the iPod. Overall, about one in four stock funds owns Apple. See Apple’s slide catches many funds. Is yours one?

 

To be sure, that partly reflects Apple’s popularity with index funds. These vehicles — like Vanguard Total Stock Market (MFD:VTSMX)  , which owned more than $6 billion of Apple shares at Dec. 31—merely buy stocks based on their market values. For those funds, Apple is automatically their largest holding.

 

But many prominent actively managed funds, including Fidelity Contrafund (MFD:FCNTX)  —Apple made up 8.2% of its portfolio as of its most recently published figures — and T. Rowe Price Blue Chip Growth (MFD:TRBCX)   — 8.6% — are also big fans. While both those names have strong long-term track records, some fund managers were likely tempted to hold big stakes for the wrong reasons, according to experts. “You want to show you own a successful stock,” says Lipper analyst Jeff Tjornehoj. “It’s not easy to get rid of.” (A tool like Morningstar’s Instant X-Ray can tell you how much Apple you hold via your funds.) See Morningstar’s Instant X-Ray

WSJ’s George Stahl takes a look at current iPhone popularity and offers some tips on how Apple can re-energize its stock.

 

Now investors that rode the Apple bandwagon — and frankly everyone else too — is feeling the stock’s reverberation. The S&P 500 was up 13.8% last year. Apple, which at its peak amounted for about 5% of the index, added roughly a percentage point to that gain, according to S&P. Today the index was flat in early afternoon trading, and for the year so far it’s up 4.8%, but would have risen nearly 5.7% without Apple’s drag.

 

Sliverblatt says the only stocks in his memory to take up such a big slice of the index were IBM and the old AT&T in the early 1980s, although he doesn’t remember their price swings having as big an impact on returns. “I didn’t see anything like this,” he say.

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Why LinkedIn Beats Facebook As A Stock – Infographic

This chart shows LinkedIn’s revenue growth from Q1 2009 to Q1 2012, broken down by segment. It is the reason why Wall Street likes LinkedIn more than Facebook. LinkedIn has “three legs” to stand on, while Facebook relies on advertising to create revenue.

Source: Statista

Why Wall Street MUST Engage In Serious Social Media Efforts

Latest since the financial crisis, Wall Street organizations have a difficult stand with the public. The image is bad and this is probably an understatement. Over the past few years hardly any organization or leader of a Wall Street organization has made an effort to improve the public opinion. The opposite is the case. Just recently JP Morgan Chase, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs provided the public again with bad ammunition against their brands and public images. The constant inactivity in brand maintenance is now starting to hurt the bottom lines.  It can now be watched how some minor efforts have started taking place.

In the past those brands believed that their brands have nothing to do with the public, since only a few are catering their services to people on the street. Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs don’t cater to the average Joe on the street and if, only in an indirect way. This assumption is as wrong as it gets. It took a while until this came to the surface, but since Facebook’s almost scandalous IPO even the last on Wall Street should have gotten the message. For those that haven’t understood why they have direct contact with the public and why this can hurt future business, here is the short and easy explanation: Continue reading

Is Mark Zuckerberg’s Business Attire Sufficient? – Poll

With Facebook’s much anticipated IPO coming close, the discussion has now turned on Mark Zuckerberg and his business attire. His “hoodie” is the main subject on several TV stations. What do you think? Should he change his habit and “dress for success”, or is this phrase an old hat, especially since dressed up Wall Street has demonstrated that wearing a suit alone, doesn’t really cut it. Your vote is appreciated.

Lehman E-Mails Show Wall Street Arrogance Led to the Fall – Bloomberg

Lehman E-Mails Show Wall Street Arrogance Led to the Fall – Bloomberg.

 

Lehman E-Mails Show Wall Street Arrogance Led to the Fall

Lehman E-Mails

Illustration by Brian Walker

 

If one wants to understand the full complicity of Wall Street in the Great Recession, look no further than the voluminous package of pre-collapse Lehman Brothers documents that have been made available by the law firm Jenner & Block LLP, which has acted as the coroner in the Lehman post-mortem.

 

Most important, the cache dispels the myth that Dick Fuld, chief executive officer of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., and his close associates were unaware of the risks their business faced in 2007 and 2008. That would be bad enough, but the more devastating reality is that Fuld and his sycophants were warned repeatedly but were blinded by their hubris…More

Crime on Wall Street…

Goldman Sachs – Executive Resigns over Business Practices

Today’s Wall Street headline was the resignation of Goldman Sachs’ Head of Derivatives Business, Greg Smith. Smith, with help of the New York Times, publicized his reasons for resignation. The article describes how Goldman Sachs went from a respected firm to a reckless money maker without any concern towards any client. Smith describes Goldman Sachs as a company that is teaching and practicing business for all the wrong reasons. Goldman’s comment to the claims, “we do not share this opinion” and other popular phrases of no substance.

While all the claims are actually nothing new, Goldman Sachs’ activities are open secrets since the financial bubble busted, it should be mentioned that a huge number of banks in general work in that manner, not only since a couple of years. And there is no difference between an Investment Bank or a Retail Bank. Continue reading

Wall Street pays big to “influence” Washington

While looking at the headline of this article, I was wondering why we allow such thing to happen. It appears pretty clear that bribery and lobbying activity is the same thing. Isn’t it?

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney) — Financial industry spending to influence Washington topped $150 million for the second year in a row, with emphasis shifting to regulators of the Dodd-Frank reform law, according to watchdog groups. Read Article on CNNMoney

 

Want a job on Wall Street? – Read this…

The European Mess was Created on Wall Street – No Reason for Wall Street to Sneak Out